Superbowl Chicken Wings, A Healthy Makeover

It’s that time of the year again… we’re just days away from the big game! I love the excitement, rivalry and game-day food that comes with Super Bowl Sunday. Some of the most popular edibles are chicken wings, pizza, chips and dips. While they may be tasty, these foods are also loaded with saturated fat and salt while lacking in nutrition. 26373410_s

If you’re hosting this year, try making something new that is just as delicious and cancer-protective: chicken skewers with a zesty peanut dipping sauce. This recipe is a definite crowd pleaser – something that can help ease the competition-driven tension.

Using all white-meat chicken tenders on a grill keeps the fat content low and the portion size right. By marinating the chicken ahead of time, you will infuse flavor into the meat while also reducing the formation of cancer-causing substances caused by grilling.

Chicken Skewers Continue reading


New grants, new research – thanks

January is an exciting time around the AICR offices. This is when our newly-funded investigators begin work on their projects, and it’s a reminder to us that scientific research provides the basis for all of AICR’s work. Our grant program is extremely competitive and only the most novel and promising projects make it through our rigorous peer-review 2015-research-collage-smallprocess. This year’s funded research grants cover a wide variety of topics but they all focus on how nutrition, physical activity, or obesity is related to cancer, and they are all aimed at preventing cancer and improving survival.

Some of our new investigators work in labs with cell cultures or with animal models, while others work in clinics or on large population studies. You can read about their research in Cancer Research Update.

To learn more about eligibility and criteria for AICR grants, see our Grant Application Package. And if you are a researcher with a great idea for a project, keep an eye out for AICR’s call for applications in the fall. Questions? Contact us at research@aicr.org.

Thank you to AICR’s generous donors for continuing to support these innovative and important projects.

Susan Higginbotham, PhD, RD, is AICR’s Vice President of Research.


Study: Whole Grains Affect Gut Bacteria, Insulin, and Cholesterol

AICR recommends choosing whole grains over refined or processed grains— in addition to being higher in nutrients and phytochemicals, whole grains contain more fiber than refined grains. Foods containing fiber protect against colorectal cancer and may keep you full longer, helping you manage your weight. Whole grains are also linked to a lower risbowl full of oats - healthy eating - food and drinkk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Scientists are not sure why whole grains and fiber are beneficial for health, but a new study in mice published in the Journal of Nutrition adds to the evidence that changes in the types of bacteria that live in the intestines—known as the gut microbiota—may be important.

The researchers fed one group of mice flour made from whole grain oats, while the other group of mice got refined flour lower in soluble fiber. Soluble fiber slows the passage of food through the digestive tract, which may help keep you feeling full longer. It is also linked to lower cholesterol and increased insulin sensitivity, important factors in the development of heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Both diets had the same amount of protein, carbohydrate, fat, and insoluble fiber. Continue reading