Sodas Top Desserts for Added Sugars; Last Day for Label Comment

If you want to know how much sugar food manufacturers are adding to your foods, today’s your last day to tell the FDA. That could make a difference to how much added sugars people consume, suggests a recent study, which found that Americans are getting far more of our added sugars from sugary beverages than desserts or candy combined. And,canstockphoto10102403 for the most part, we are purchasing those sugary products from stores.

The study, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, also found that almost 15 percent of Americans’ daily calories comes from sugars added to our foods or drinks.

For cancer prevention, cutting down on sugary beverages is one of AICR’s 10 recommendations. Sugary sodas and other beverages link to weight gain, and being overweight links to increased risk of eight cancers.

In an average American’s day, sodas and energy sports drinks was the largest source of added sugars, making up 34 percent. Grain desserts, such as cookies and other baked goods, was the next largest category coming in at 13 percent; fruit drinks, candy and dairy desserts followed, at 8, 7 and 6 percent, respectively.

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Making Your Lentils Savory in Indian Dal

indian-dalLentils and dry beans are rich in fiber that helps to prevent colorectal cancer. Our Health-e-Recipe for Indian Dal with Yogurt and Cucumbers makes lentils into a savory treat.

Onions, ginger, garlic, cumin and Indian spice mix (“masala”) give these lentils more of the protective phytochemicals found in al plant foods, plus a spicy fragrance that stimulates the appetite. Lentils also contain protein, and dal is a dish eaten daily in India.

Although red lentils are called for in this recipe, you can opt for green lentils instead. Lentils don’t need soaking and can be cooked either to a liquid consistency of soup or simmered longer until they become thick enough to eat as a dip with whole-wheat pita bread. Creamy, cool yogurt and chopped cucumber balance the spices in the lentils. It only takes 30 minutes to prepare this tasty, nutritious dish.

Find more cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Garden Harvest: What to Do with All Those Cancer-Fighting Summer Squash

Last week I wrote about the importance of eating vegetables and fruit for health and cancer prevention. It’s the peak of summer garden produce now – a great time to load your plate with delicious, fresh and seasonal veggies and fruit.Summer Squash_med

If you’re a gardener, friends with a gardener, or a member of a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture), that means there’s a good chance you have a kitchen full of zucchini and summer squash.

You’ll benefit from your these foods’ vitamins, minerals and cancer protective phytochemicals, but also get the bonus of filling up on low calorie and fiber-packed dishes. AICR’s expert report and continuous updates found that non-starchy vegetables, like summer squash, lower risk for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, mouth, pharynx and larynx.

After you’ve steamed, stir-fried and made zucchini bread, you may be wondering what else you can do with these summer staples. Here are some of AICR’s tested recipes to help you use that bounty in a healthy and delicious way: Continue reading