SNPs, Activity, Vitamin D Research, Highlights from AICR Award Winners at ObesityWeek

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Congratulations to this year’s ObesityWeek Conference poster winners.

The annual conference, held this year in New Orleans, focuses on the basic science, treatment, and prevention of obesity. It is an important topic because obesity links to several types of cancer, including post-menopausal breast, advanced prostate, and colorectal.

Highlighted below are three of the winners of the AICR research poster competition, which was announced yesterday. The research focused on how genetics, physical activity, and nutrients influence cancer risk, treatment, and survival.

Note: These poster findings have not been published and have not been subjected to the peer-reviewed process. Read more… “SNPs, Activity, Vitamin D Research, Highlights from AICR Award Winners at ObesityWeek”

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    AICR joins National Obesity Care Week – here’s why

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    This week, the 2nd Annual National Obesity Care Week (NOCW) seeks to ignite a national movement to ensure anyone affected by obesity receives respectful and comprehensive care. AICR is proud to join the campaign.

    Today, more than a third of the adult population is affected by obesity. The number of adults who are affected by severe obesity continues to rise.

    These statistics have serious implications for cancer rates. Aside from not smoking, staying a healthy weight is the single largest risk factor related to cancer. AICR research links excess body fat to eleven cancers, including colorectal, post-menopausal breast, esophageal and stomach. Read more… “AICR joins National Obesity Care Week – here’s why”

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      Do foods high in glycemic index increase breast cancer risk?

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      Eating foods with a high glycemic index (GI) can make your blood sugar rise higher and faster after eating. Theoretically, that could cause unhealthy levels of hormones like insulin, which seem to promote development of some cancers, including breast.

      However, research suggests that glycemic index by itself has little to no relation to breast cancer risk.

      The Research

      An analysis of 19 studies found no link between breast cancer risk and diets high in GI beyond what could occur by chance. Even glycemic load (GL), which takes portion size of foods into account, showed no significant link to breast cancer risk. The links were not consistent and could reflect other qualities of those diets. Another analysis that included only studies with a stronger design that follows people over time (called prospective cohort studies) found a weak five to six percent increase in breast cancer risk when comparing diets at the very highest to the very lowest glycemic index or glycemic load, respectively. Read more… “Do foods high in glycemic index increase breast cancer risk?”

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