Few American adults meet fruit and veggie goals, raising cancer risk

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A new study covering over 300,000 adults from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that few American adults meet the 2015 Dietary Guidelines recommendations for vegetables and fruit. Nationally, about 12% of adults eat enough fruit and a little more than 9% meet the vegetable goal.

AICR Research shows that eating a plant-based diet with plenty of vegetables and fruit can reduce risk for many cancers. The Dietary Guidelines also link a vegetable and fruit-heavy diet to a lower risk for chronic diseases like heart disease and type 2 diabetes. They recommend 1.5 – 2 cups of fruits and 2-3 cups of vegetables daily for adults.

The CDC researchers found that women, those with higher income and adults 51 or older were more likely to eat enough vegetables. Hispanics, women and 31-50 year olds most often met the fruit goal.

There were large differences between states, with West Virginia showing the lowest intake of vegetables (5.8%) and fruit (7.3%) and DC showing highest fruit intake (15.5%) while highest vegetable consumption was reported in Alaska (12%). You can see the statistics for your state here. Read more… “Few American adults meet fruit and veggie goals, raising cancer risk”

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    Obesity and Cancer Research, Finding Solutions that Fit

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    I recently attended the annual Obesity Week conference, a joint meeting hosted by The Obesity Society and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), in National Harbor, Maryland.  Given the scale, complexity and impact of overweight and obesity on health and wellness, it was encouraging to see that these problems are being addressed from every possible angle.

    Three sessions at the conference were focused on obesity and cancer; in addition, AICR sponsored a special cancer-focused issue of the Obesity Journal, timed to coincide with Obesity Week.  The research presented covered the full spectrum from lab studies to human interventions and policy advice on the links between obesity and cancer.

    The defining moment for me was how cancer researcher Dr. Stephen Hursting captured the mood of the meeting perfectly saying: “We need to stop asking, “Is obesity a risk factor for cancer?” Yes. It is. Now we need to focus on how to reduce the impact of obesity on cancer risk and outcomes”. Read more… “Obesity and Cancer Research, Finding Solutions that Fit”

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      Major Oncology Group Underscores AICR Research Linking Alcohol and Cancer Risks

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      AICR’s analysis of the global research has continued to show over the years that drinking alcohol regularly – even light drinking – increases the risk of certain cancers.

      Now a major oncology organization, The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), has identified alcohol as a definite risk factor for cancer for the first time, citing AICR/WCRF reports as evidence. The statement, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, aims to raise awareness of this link for both the general public and oncologists. Read more… “Major Oncology Group Underscores AICR Research Linking Alcohol and Cancer Risks”

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