Gov’t Changes Mammogram Recommendations – What’s AICR’s Take?

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On Monday, November 16, the United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) announced that it is changing its guidelines for mammography and no longer recommends routine screening for women between the ages of 40 and 49.

By pushing the recommended age to begin regular mammograms from 40 to 50, the task force’s stated goal is to prevent harm caused by “false positive” results seen among 40 to 49 year olds.

What will AICR do? Are we changing our materials on breast cancer to reflect this new development?

The short answer: Not yet.

Follow this link for the longer answer, and the reasons behind it.

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    This Week’s AICR Health-e-Recipe: Healthy Pesto Possibilities

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    bigstockphoto_olive oil_2330122If you love pesto sauce but can’t find pine (pignoli) nuts, relax. Today’s Health-e-Recipe for Pesto Toastini from AICR uses blanched almonds for the nuts – one of severalGetty almonds FD002107_47 substitutions that still gives you a great-tasting pesto. (Walnuts are another great swap for pine nuts).

    Baby spinach and parsley add variety and phytochemicals to green basil. And in olive oil, scientists continue to find healthy compounds – not only polyphenols and carotenoids, but also oleocanthal, which has anti-inflammatory benefits, according to the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

    Here’s how to sign up to receive your weekly Health-e-Recipe, straight from the AICR Test Kitchen.

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      Fact Check: Is the Jury Still Out on Cancer Prevention?

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      The New York Times says so, in a front-page article on the status of cancer prevention research.

      But experts at the major national and international cancer research organizations — including many who attended the 2009 AICR Research Conference (a scientific meeting devoted entirely to the study of lifestyle’s role in cancer prevention, treatment and survival) — strongly disagree with the article’s characterization of the science.

      Read the latest AICR Fact Check to find out what the NYT‘s reporting didn’t cover.

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