Report on Lifestyle and Kidney Cancer Risk: Unraveling the Alcohol Link

The evidence is stronger than ever that being overweight or obese increases the risk for kidney cancer, according to a report we released today. It’s the key finding in the latest update from our ongoing systematic review of the global research, the Continuous Update Project (CUP).Wines_FD001551_7

Today’s report reaffirms the conclusion of our previous report, making kidney one of ten cancers now strongly associated with overweight and obesity. You can read the key findings here.

Among those findings, you’ll also find a new conclusion with alcohol. Here’s what we can say about alcohol and kidney cancer: it’s complicated.

Alcohol is known to be a potent carcinogen, and has been definitely linked in previous reports from AICR and WCRF International to greater risk of cancer of the mouth, pharynx and larynx, esophagus, liver, colorectum, and breast. This is why AICR recommends that if people choose to drink at all, they limit their consumption to 1 drink/day for women, and 2 drinks/day for men.

But when our CUP panel examined recent evidence from 8 studies, they found that moderate amounts of alcohol (about two drinks per day) were associated with lower risk for kidney cancer. Continue reading

Study: How the New Nutrition Facts Label May Lead You to Eat More

If you saw this label on a food you were about to eat, how would you interpret the serving size? If you’re like most people, you would say that 2/3 cup is the recommended serving for this food, and that common misinterpretation may soon lead you to eat more than you should when the nutrition label serving sizes boost upwards, suggests a recent study published in the journal Appetite

This could cause the unintended consequence of weight gain. AICR’s first recommendation, maintaining a healthy weight, is one of the most important steps you can take to reduce cancer risk.

The serving size on the nutrition label – that 2/3 cup – actually represents the amount most people eat in one sitting. And it’s about to change for about one in five food items as part of the FDA plans to revise the label. We wrote about it here. The proposed label will adjust the serving sizes to more accurately represent what people typically eat, which is more than the current serving sizes. For example, the serving size for ice cream would increase from one-half cup to one cup. Continue reading

Half of US Adults Have Diabetes or PreDiabetes, What that Means for Cancer Risk

About one of every two American adults has or is at risk of having diabetes, with approximately a third of those with diabetes unaware they have it, finds a new study that offers important insights into cancer risk. People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for many of the most common cancers, including liver, colon and postmenopausal breast.
The study was published in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Study authors used various national health survey data conducted periodically from 1988 to 2012. Participants had answered health questions and gone in for an exam, where they gave blood samples and had their weight and height measured. Anyone who reported a previous diagnosis of diabetes went into the diabetes category. Those with various measures of blood sugar levels over a set amount were categorized as having either undiagnosed or pre-diabetes.

Using one set of measures with the most current available data (2011-12), 14 percent of adults have diabetes. Yet about a third of those with signs of the disease have not been diagnosed. Another set of blood sugar measures puts the figure at 12 percent of adults having diabetes with a quarter of these people having the disease undiagnosed.

And another third of adults – slightly more – have prediabetes, a condition that shares many risk factors with common cancers.

Source data: JAMA. September 8, 2015, Vol 314, No. 10

Source data: JAMA. September 8, 2015, Vol 314, No. 10

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