Meet AICR’s New Director of Research, Cancer Scientist and Survivor

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The American Institute for Cancer Research has a new Director of Research, Nigel Brockton, PhD, and we’re looking forward to all the expertise he brings.

Dr. Brockton has first-hand experience with cancer, being diagnosed in his final year of high school and then his cancer returned while an undergraduate studying marine biology in Scotland. He then shifted to cancer research, graduating with a PhD in genetic epidemiology. Here, Dr. Brockton shares his passion for the field of cancer prevention and survivorship, along with how AICR has intertwined with his work.

Read more… “Meet AICR’s New Director of Research, Cancer Scientist and Survivor”

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    HealthTalk: A new approach to cancer care, making food part of treatment and recovery

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    Over the last two years, I’ve loved being part of several workshops for dietitians and chefs who are bringing a new approach to cancer care. It’s about actively engaging those diagnosed with cancer in learning to choose and prepare healing foods and a health-promoting diet.

    That’s important because cancer patients undergoing treatment and after can face a lot of eating challenges, including changes in appetite, energy, and food preferences. These choices can take a toll on strength, vitality and even ability to continue a treatment plan.

    Here are a few strategies that you or a loved one may find helpful during and following cancer treatment. Read more… “HealthTalk: A new approach to cancer care, making food part of treatment and recovery”

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      HealthTalk: Flaxseed and Breast Cancer

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      Q: Does flaxseed protect against breast cancer or increase the risk?

      A: Flaxseed most often raises questions regarding breast cancer because of its compounds called lignans. These compounds, sometimes called phytoestrogens, have a chemical structure similar to estrogen. At first glance, it might seem that would increase risk of estrogen-sensitive (ER-positive) breast cancer, which is spurred by excess estrogen.

      However, research suggests these tiny brown seeds do not increase cancer risk and could even be protective.

      In animal studies of human breast cancer, flaxseed and lignans isolated from it reduce breast cancer development, slow growth of existing breast tumors and lower levels of several growth factors that promote breast cancer. Human studies are limited but suggest that if anything, including one to four tablespoons of flaxseed per day might reduce breast cancer risk, especially in post-menopausal women. Read more… “HealthTalk: Flaxseed and Breast Cancer”

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