“A Sea-Change in How the US Approaches Disease Prevention”

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Great short piece on America Public Media’s Marketplace Morning Report on a story that hasn’t gotten the attention it should:  How the new healthcare legislation broadens our national approach to diseases like cancer by placing an unprecedented amount of focus on prevention. Take a listen.

Understand: More and better prevention efforts are sorely needed and long overdue.  But if there’s one thing our policy report made clear, it’s that government can’t do it alone.  All levels of society – industry, schools, health professionals, the media, individuals – helped get us to where we are now, and must play a role in the kind of sweeping societal changes needed to make it easier for everyone to make healthy, cancer protective choices.

How are our policy report’s 49 recommendations addressed in the new legislation?  What, exactly, remains to be done?  It’ll take some time to tease out those answers.

In the meantime, count on the American Institute for Cancer Research for practical everyday advice that’s based on research your generosity makes possible — research that reveals how you can help protect yourself from cancer.

AICR Launches Spanish Summary of Policy Report

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Yesterday, at an event at the Headquarters of the Pan-American Health Organization (the regional office of the World Health Organization in the Americas), we launched the Spanish summary of our major report, Policy and Action for Cancer Prevention.

Launch of AICR PAHO Spanish Policy Summary, PAHO HQ
Launch of AICR/PAHO Spanish Summary, PAHO HQ
Press questions at AICR PAHO Summary Launch
Press Questions at AICR/PAHO Summary Launch

The summary was published jointly by AICR and PAHO, and adapts the report’s global policy recommendation to Latin American countries.

The launch event here in DC was well-attended, and over 30 countries participated via web. A lively discussion followed (the Q and A session went on for over 30 minutes) including the comments of the Deputy Health Minister of Panama, who participated by phone.

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AICR Vice President for Programs Deirdre McGinley-Gieser spoke briefly to fit the new summary into the wider context of AICR’s ongoing mission, and to express how excited we are to partner with PAHO, an organization that can help effect the kind of changes that could lower cancer rates in the Americas and save millions of lives.

You can read about the AICR/WCRF Policy Report here.

The Spanish summary is available on PAHO website.

Today is World Cancer Day

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america-globeFebruary 4th is World Cancer Day – an annual global awareness-raising initiative organized by the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) that shines a spotlight on the small, everyday changes that can lower cancer risk.

AICR welcomes World Cancer Day 2010 as an opportunity to share the vital, life-saving, evidence-based message that we are not powerless before this disease. The evidence is in, and its shows that steps can be taken, by anyone, at any age, to help protect against cancer.

AICR President Marilyn Gentry shares her thoughts on this important day.

Meanwhile, AICR is marking World Cancer Day by launching two translated summaries of our major policy report, Policy and Action for Cancer Prevention. This report translates the scientific evidence into clear recommendations that show how all levels of society – government, individuals, schools, workplaces, the media, and more – can work together to reduce cancer incidence around the globe.

Working with the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO), we’ve produced a Spanish summary of the policy report that tailors recommendations to Latin American countries and regions.

We’ve also partnered with the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) to produce a Portuguese summary that speaks to the policy makers in Brazil and other countries where cancer rates are rising.

We’re launching both translations today, at events in Washington and Rio de Janeiro.  We’ll keep you posted.