Mixed Messaging on Red Wine: Separating Myth from Fact

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Many choices you make to lower the risk of cancer pack an extra health-protective punch because they also lower the risk of heart disease. But trying to make a smart choice about alcohol can be confusing.
Alcohol — especially wine — has an image as a heart-healthy choice, and fewer than 4 in 10 people are aware that alcohol poses a cancer risk. But it does, and the link should be of special concern to women since increased breast cancer risk starts at relatively low amounts of alcohol.

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Ask The Dietitian: Get Your Facts Right on Fiber and Whole Grains

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During our recent webinar, there were nuanced questions on whole grains and fibers, and we were unable to get to them all. I will try to address some of the important questions that came up and I think deserve a fuller response. Why do nutritional messages about lowering cancer risk talk separately about fibers and whole grains? Doesn’t taking care of one automatically take care of the other? Which is more important to lower cancer risk – fiber or whole grains? Whole grains are an important source of dietary fiber, and both are linked to a lower risk of colorectal cancer. So there is an overlap between the two. In other words, each offers distinctive benefits, and it is important to consider how you include each in your everyday eating habits.

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Few US Adults Meet Physical Activity Guidelines for Health, Cancer Prevention

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A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds that only about 23% of US adults meet federal recommendations for aerobic and muscle-strengthening activity. This means that more than 3 out of 4 adults are missing out on profound health benefits from activity and putting themselves at increased risk for cancer, type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

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