Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer: Are We Missing Key Clues?

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A new analysis, published in the Lancet Public Health, reporting the significant increase in obesity-related cancers among younger adults in the U.S. grabbed media headlines because the findings are worrisome in the context of the rising trend of obesity, particularly childhood obesity, in the United States. The researchers noted that the increased rates were particularly apparent in six of the 12 obesity-related cancer types in patients aged 25-49 years. Colorectal cancer is one of the obesity-related cancers and the increasing rates of colorectal cancer in younger adults has already been causing alarm and has prompted physicians and researchers to investigate the potential causes for this early-onset disease over the past decade.

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Mixed Messaging on Red Wine: Separating Myth from Fact

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Many choices you make to lower the risk of cancer pack an extra health-protective punch because they also lower the risk of heart disease. But trying to make a smart choice about alcohol can be confusing.
Alcohol — especially wine — has an image as a heart-healthy choice, and fewer than 4 in 10 people are aware that alcohol poses a cancer risk. But it does, and the link should be of special concern to women since increased breast cancer risk starts at relatively low amounts of alcohol.

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Ask The Dietitian: Get Your Facts Right on Fiber and Whole Grains

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During our recent webinar, there were nuanced questions on whole grains and fibers, and we were unable to get to them all. I will try to address some of the important questions that came up and I think deserve a fuller response. Why do nutritional messages about lowering cancer risk talk separately about fibers and whole grains? Doesn’t taking care of one automatically take care of the other? Which is more important to lower cancer risk – fiber or whole grains? Whole grains are an important source of dietary fiber, and both are linked to a lower risk of colorectal cancer. So there is an overlap between the two. In other words, each offers distinctive benefits, and it is important to consider how you include each in your everyday eating habits.

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