AICR-Funded Ovarian Cancer Study Making News

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An intriguing AICR-funded study on flaxseed and ovarian cancer is making news today. The study investigated how a flaxseed-enriched diet would effect ovarian cancer development in hens. Although the study was conducted in animals, it will hopefully lead to research that will help ovarian cancer survivors.

Why hens? Hens are the only other animals besides humans known to spontaneously develop ovarian cancer, and at a relatively high rate. That makes hens a strong model to study ovarian cancer, a disease dubbed “the silent killer” because it is often not detected until the later stages.

You can read a news report about the study here.

You can also read an earlier report on the study and the lead scientist Dale Hales, PhD. , which we wrote about in Cancer Research Update.

Diet-Cancer News Roundup

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Steve the AICR Librarian scours the net for the latest developments in the study of cancer risk as it relates to diet, physical activity and weight.  Here’s his latest roundup.

ALCOHOL

Drinking Alcohol Linked to Unhealthy Diet

BREAST CANCER

Multivitamins Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

Preventing Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women by Achievable Diet Modification: A missed opportunity in public health policy.

CANCER PATIENTS

Promising Hormone May Help Reduce Malnutrition in Gastric Cancer Patients

Effect of Medical Staff’s Advice on Changing Dietary Behavior in Women with Cancer (Hungary)

CONSUMERS

Cultural Occasions for Snacking

OFFBEAT

Diet of Contaminated InsectsHarms Endangered Meat-Eating Plants

Diet-Cancer News Roundup

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Steve the AICR Librarian regularly combs the net for news relevant to our mission.

We love getting these updates, because they help us keep on top of the latest developments.  They also provide fodder for discussion both internally (ie, around the watercooler) and externally (ie, in AICR publications like Cancer Research Update and eNews.)

We figured we shouldn’t keep Steve’s hard work to ourselves, so here’s his latest roundup.  Hope you find it as useful as we do.

COLON CANCER

Mayo Researchers Link Obesity To Worse Outcome In Patients Being Treated For Colon Cancer

Magnesium may decrease colon cancer risk: Study

Lifestyle factors and p53 mutation patterns in colorectal cancer patients in the EPIC-Norfolk study.

CONSUMERS

Research investigates what consumers see as ‘natural’

OBESITY

For Obese People, Prejudice in Plain Sight

Anti-obesity drugs unlikely to provide lasting benefit according to scientists

PATIENT NUTRITION

Chef d’cancer patients: Jack Shoop lovingly crafts a medical center’s meals