“A Sea-Change in How the US Approaches Disease Prevention”

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Great short piece on America Public Media’s Marketplace Morning Report on a story that hasn’t gotten the attention it should:  How the new healthcare legislation broadens our national approach to diseases like cancer by placing an unprecedented amount of focus on prevention. Take a listen.

Understand: More and better prevention efforts are sorely needed and long overdue.  But if there’s one thing our policy report made clear, it’s that government can’t do it alone.  All levels of society – industry, schools, health professionals, the media, individuals – helped get us to where we are now, and must play a role in the kind of sweeping societal changes needed to make it easier for everyone to make healthy, cancer protective choices.

How are our policy report’s 49 recommendations addressed in the new legislation?  What, exactly, remains to be done?  It’ll take some time to tease out those answers.

In the meantime, count on the American Institute for Cancer Research for practical everyday advice that’s based on research your generosity makes possible — research that reveals how you can help protect yourself from cancer.

Serve Health to Your Friends

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Do your friends contribute to your unhealthy food choices?

According to a series of studies published in the Journal of Consumer Research, they may do just that.

In the first  study, some participants were asked to select four foods for a friend.  They could choose from 16 foods – a mixture of “healthy” and “indulgent” choices.  The other participants were to choose from the same foods for themselves.

Those choosing for themselves selected a healthy balance of healthy and indulgent foods, while the other group chose mostly indulgent foods.

The second study at a supermarket found that shoppers did, in fact, purchase more indulgent foods for friends and family.  Yet another study in the series showed that when aware of their friends’ health goals, people chose a more balanced mix of foods.

The authors note that this could be a real public health problem as it may be yet another contributor to Americans’ weight problem.  Overweight and obesity are a cause of certain cancers, heart disease, diabetes and other chronic diseases.

How can you help your friends and family with their health goals?

Diet-Cancer News Roundup

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Steve the AICR Librarian regularly combs the net for news relevant to our mission.

We love getting these updates, because they help us keep on top of the latest developments.  They also provide fodder for discussion both internally (ie, around the watercooler) and externally (ie, in AICR publications like Cancer Research Update and eNews.)

We figured we shouldn’t keep Steve’s hard work to ourselves, so here’s his latest roundup.  Hope you find it as useful as we do.

COLON CANCER

Mayo Researchers Link Obesity To Worse Outcome In Patients Being Treated For Colon Cancer

Magnesium may decrease colon cancer risk: Study

Lifestyle factors and p53 mutation patterns in colorectal cancer patients in the EPIC-Norfolk study.

CONSUMERS

Research investigates what consumers see as ‘natural’

OBESITY

For Obese People, Prejudice in Plain Sight

Anti-obesity drugs unlikely to provide lasting benefit according to scientists

PATIENT NUTRITION

Chef d’cancer patients: Jack Shoop lovingly crafts a medical center’s meals