Be Active, Get Smarter, Reduce Your Cancer Risk

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The reasons to make physical activity part of a daily routine just keep building. For one thing: there’s the evidence linking physical activity to reduced cancer risk. The latest incentive to get active comes from a new study that found exercise speeds learning and improves blood flow to the brain in monkeys.

Previous studies have linked improved learning to exercise in rodents; but this study examines this link in monkeys. The study is published in the journal Neuroscience; you can read the release here.

Physical activity can reduce cancer risk; can it make us learn better?

In the study, one group of monkeys was aerobically active – running on a treadmill for an hour each day, five days per week, for five months. Another group simply sat on the treadmill for the same amount of time.

Cognitive tests found that the exercising monkeys learned one task twice as quickly as the sedentary animals.

When it comes to exercise and cancer prevention, the link between physical activity and reducing cancer risk is clear. Regular activity acts with weight control – and excess body fat causes several different cancers – and also appears to have biological effects that lower cancer risk, such as strengthening the immune system.

Want to see if you are active enough? Take our quiz.

If you already incorporate physical activity into your day, how did you get into the habit? Any tips?

Stairs for Cancer Prevention?

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Blogging from a conference of the Society of Public Health Educators (SOPHE)

What are Public Health Educators talking about?

As at many health related conferences, the talk is about developing environments in neighborhoods, workplaces and schools to promote good health.  That is – encourage more physical activity and access to healthy food. Just about every researcher and practitioner is talking about how to engage the community and neighborhood to help drive these changes.  This may seem obvious, but it hasn’t always been done.  Read about AICR’s Policy Report Policy and Action for Cancer Prevention, which includes recommendations for government, schools, industry, health professionals and others.

Interesting research tidbit: One of the speakers today mentioned a simple initiative of posting signs and prompts around the workplace to encourage more use of stairs in the building.  This has shown moderate effectiveness with anywhere from 2-9% increase in stair use.  While not a huge change in behavior, it’s an easy intervention for inspiring some change.  And an easy way to incorporate more physical activity – which lowers risk for cancer  – into your day.

Do you choose stairs or elevators when given the choice?

Diet-Cancer News Roundup

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Steve the AICR Librarian scours the net for the latest developments in the study of cancer risk as it relates to diet, physical activity and weight.  Here’s his latest roundup.

ALCOHOL

Drinking Alcohol Linked to Unhealthy Diet

BREAST CANCER

Multivitamins Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

Preventing Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women by Achievable Diet Modification: A missed opportunity in public health policy.

CANCER PATIENTS

Promising Hormone May Help Reduce Malnutrition in Gastric Cancer Patients

Effect of Medical Staff’s Advice on Changing Dietary Behavior in Women with Cancer (Hungary)

CONSUMERS

Cultural Occasions for Snacking

OFFBEAT

Diet of Contaminated InsectsHarms Endangered Meat-Eating Plants