Reducing Colorectal Cancer Risk by Cutting Red Meat

By Posted on Leave a comment on Reducing Colorectal Cancer Risk by Cutting Red Meat

The latest research shows that eating more than 12 to 18 ounces of red meat per week increases the risk of colorectal cancer. AICR recommends limiting the amount of red and processed meat in your diet to reduce the risk of cancer. When you hear this recommendation, it may be hard to imagine what else you would eat if these are currently mainstays in most of your meals. If you have been eating beef, lamb and pork beyond the recommended limit of 12 to 18 ounces a week – which is about 4 to 6 deck-of-cards sized portions – perhaps it seems like your only alternative is eating more poultry. But here are a few tips on cutting back on that red meat from your daily diet.

Read more… “Reducing Colorectal Cancer Risk by Cutting Red Meat”
SHARE:

    Mixed Messaging on Red Wine: Separating Myth from Fact

    By Posted on Leave a comment on Mixed Messaging on Red Wine: Separating Myth from Fact

    Many choices you make to lower the risk of cancer pack an extra health-protective punch because they also lower the risk of heart disease. But trying to make a smart choice about alcohol can be confusing.
    Alcohol — especially wine — has an image as a heart-healthy choice, and fewer than 4 in 10 people are aware that alcohol poses a cancer risk. But it does, and the link should be of special concern to women since increased breast cancer risk starts at relatively low amounts of alcohol.

    Read more… “Mixed Messaging on Red Wine: Separating Myth from Fact”

    SHARE: