Here Is How the Experts Stay Active in Winter

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With the latest AICR Cancer Prevention Recommendations and the newly updated Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, we have more guidance about why – and how – we need to move more. The main message is: MOVE MORE, SIT LESS – an important first step. But winter and cold weather can be a major impediment to getting active and eventually meeting the recommended 20-30 minutes daily of moderate physical activity.

Health care experts know the benefits of activity, so how do they keep fit in winter? We asked oncology dietitians how they stay active, and what they recommend to their patients when it’s just too cold or nasty to go outside. We shared some ideas in AICR’s eNewsletter this month, but here are even more of those creative choices*:

  • A self-challenge: I like the Fitbit to keep track of my activity. I have a “challenge” from 5 am to 6 pm to get at least 250 steps each hour. At 10 minutes before the hour, I get an alert if I haven’t achieved that.
  • I use the GoNoodle app for my kids (and I join in sometimes). – J. Paige Williamson, MS, RD, LDN
  • Try SparkPeople.com videos! They are good for a variety of abilities and fitness levels. – Margaret Martin, RD, MS, LDN, CDE

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Wansink Debacle does not Undercut Nutrition and Cancer Link

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In the past few weeks you may have seen news headlines about “nutrition research taking another hit.” At the center of those stories is Dr. Brian Wansink, a prominent food researcher from Cornell University. A university investigation found that he committed research misconduct, and now, over a dozen of his papers have been retracted by prestigious academic journals.

Most of his research is on how the food environment affects an individual’s eating behavior and food choices. For example, he reported that bigger plates correlate to eating more and that putting healthy choices like water, in front of all other beverages, led to more people choosing water more often. He did not conduct research looking at how diet impacts specific health outcomes, such as heart disease or cancer.

It is unfortunate that the recent retractions of Dr. Wansink’s research papers have led to headlines that challenge the broader validity of nutrition research. His research has no bearing on the link between diet and specific health outcomes, such as cancer. Organizations like AICR conduct systematic literature reviews and analyses of the highest quality research linking diet to cancer and other chronic diseases. Nutritional research is constantly evolving but assessments of the entirety of the available research provide the most reliable evidence on the relation between diet and cancer risk. Read more… “Wansink Debacle does not Undercut Nutrition and Cancer Link”

Few US Adults Meet Physical Activity Guidelines for Health, Cancer Prevention

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A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds that only about 23% of US adults meet federal recommendations for aerobic and muscle-strengthening activity. This means that more than 3 out of 4 adults are missing out on profound health benefits from activity and putting themselves at increased risk for cancer, type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Read more… “Few US Adults Meet Physical Activity Guidelines for Health, Cancer Prevention”