Friday Quiz: Test Your Cancer Prevention Knowledge

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Have you been reading our blog lately? We’ve posted some exciting research reports and interviews with researchers from our conference as well as information about the weekly Health-e-Recipe. Take the quiz and then link to the related blog postings from the answers below.

1.  What are SOFAS?

a.            Furniture you sit on to watch TV; couches
b.            Stretch Out For Activity Sessions
c.            Solid Fats and Added Sugar

2.  What amount of broccoli sprouts contains the level of sulforaphane used in lab studies that led to epigenetic changes resulting in reduced telomerase in cells?

a.            5 cups
b.            1 cup
c.            2 Tablespoons

3.            True or False.  If you haven’t been active or eaten a healthy diet by the time you’re 70, it’s too late to do anything to lower your cancer risk.

4.            True or False.  The bacteria that live in our gut may play a role in cancer prevention.

5.            True or False:  Some day there may be dietary guidelines for preventing DNA damage.

6.            AICR’s Health-e-Recipe this week contains what healthy food(s)?

a.            Almonds
b.            Figs
c.            Both

7.  True or False:  Sedentary behavior may increase cancer risk.

Keep reading for answers and click on answer to read the original post:

Read more… “Friday Quiz: Test Your Cancer Prevention Knowledge”

Couch Potatoes and Cancer Risk

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At the AICR Research Conference last week, there was a lot of talk on the evidence linking physical activity to improving the health of cancer survivors. For several cancers, including breast and colon, a growing number of studies suggest that physical activity can help reduce risk of recurrence and improve many aspects of survivor’s physiological and psychological health.

But if being physically active can decrease cancer risk, can sitting around a lot – a.k.a. sedentary behavior – increase risk? It’s quite possible, suggests a new review article. The article was published in Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, and you can read the abstract here.

Sedentary behavior research is an emerging field of study. In research, the term sedentary behavior refers to prolonged sitting or lying down, such as playing computer games or watching TV for hours at a time.  If a woman exercises vigorously for 60 minutes every day then watches TV all night every night, she is exhibiting sedentary behavior.

The review found that 10 of 18 studies linked increased sedentary behavior to cancer risk. Sedentary behavior was linked with increased colorectal, endometrial, ovarian, and prostate cancer risk; cancer mortality in women; and weight gain in colorectal cancer survivors.

AICR’s expert report and its updates found that sedentary living increased the risk of excess body fat, which is one cause of seven types of cancer. Right now, more research is needed to understand the links and mechanisms of not moving and cancer risk, but one thing is known: moving more is a good thing. Physical activity helps prevent several cancers and a host of other poor health outcomes.

For tips on being active, look on adding activity to your day.

If you have a tip of your own, please share.

From the AICR Research Conference: Dr. JoEllen Welsh on Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

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Dr. Welsh chaired our 2010 research conference and its plenary session on aging, diet, physical activity and cancer, but she also presented on her own research involving vitamin D and breast cancer.

Dr. Welsh reviews her presentation, and shares some of the implications of her cutting-edge, AICR-supported research.

Here’s a handy glossary to some of the terms she uses with which you might be unfamiliar:

“…knockout of the vdr…”:  Here, she’s talking about working w/an organism whose breast cells don’t respond to the presence of vitamin D, and tracking how this affects the way its breast tissue responds.  Her work suggests that vitamin D plays an important role in governing the breast’s immune response.

“…cytokines...”:  These are the cellular message-carriers of our immune system — they help our bodies defend against infections by passing along information and regulating our immune response.

“…the neonate…”:  The newborn.