Sitting at your standing desk? Workplace study shows strategies that get you up

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How much time do you spend sitting? If you work in an office, chances are it’s an average of around 11 hours a day and that most of your time spent sitting happens at work.

By now, you’ve probably heard that spending too much time sitting isn’t great for your health. Too much sedentary time may increase the risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and overall mortality. Making an effort to move more throughout the day may lower your cancer risk and improve your overall health.

In order to help their employees sit less, some employers have installed special desks that can be raised or lowered so that workers have the option to sit or stand. But in order for sit-stand desks to work, employees must use them.

A recent study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology suggests strategies that offices can use to make sure investments in sit-stand desks pay off. Read more… “Sitting at your standing desk? Workplace study shows strategies that get you up”

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    A Work Place Program that Improves Health, Lowers Disease Risk

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    Two Overweight Women On Diet Eating Healthy Meal In KitchenFor employees who are stressed at work or struggle to make a healthy dinner for their family, a new study finds that a flexible workplace program can help address these concerns and lead to weight loss, adding almost half an hour of weekly physical activity, and improving many other risk factors.

    The study focused on employees at risk for type 2 diabetes (86 million US adults are at risk). Lowering risk for type 2 diabetes also means reduced risk for some cancers, including colon, breast (postmenopausal), pancreas and endometrium. Type 2 diabetes increases risk of some cancers, and both diseases share several risk factors such as obesity, elevated insulin levels, and physical inactivity.

    The study, published last week in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine found significant improvement in weight, waist size, insulin levels and physical activity in participants. About 90 employees participated by attending group classes or watching a DVD and having a weekly phone call with the lifestyle coach, or a combination of those. Read more… “A Work Place Program that Improves Health, Lowers Disease Risk”

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      Holiday Hang-Ups: Staying Healthy in the Workplace

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      You sit all day. The vending machine’s full of sugary soda. Sandy from Accounting keeps a heaping bowl of fun-size candy at her desk, which you walk past on your way to and from the copier.

      bigstock-an-apple-is-on-a-computer-keyb-44723527The workplace is where you spend most of your waking time, a closed environment filled with constant inducements to move less and eat more. At holiday time, those inducements multiply. Today, more and more Human Resources professionals are taking steps to create healthier workplaces, because they know that healthier employees are happier — and, yes, more productive.

      Here at AICR, we’ve taken a series of steps to ensure we’re practicing what we preach. Here’s just a few of the ideas we’ve instituted:

      • The AICR Walking Club meets three times a week at lunchtime for a brisk walk around the neighborhood. The group activity helps members motivate one another to get and stay active. We’re looking into a running group for those employees who want to kick up their activity even more. Read more… “Holiday Hang-Ups: Staying Healthy in the Workplace”
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