Study: Before Colorectal Cancer, Eating Healthy and Following AICR Recs Prolongs Survival

For colorectal cancer, research shows that eating healthy, being active, and staying a healthy weight make a big difference in reducing the risk of developing this cancer. AICR estimates that while there are no guarantees, one of every two colorectal cancer cases can be prevented by following our recommendations.

Now a new study suggests that following AICR recommendations for prevention years before diagnosis can prolong survival for those who do develop colorectal cancer. And every recommendation followed decreased the risk of dying a little more.

The study was published in BMC Medicine.

10-recommendations-infographic Continue reading


The Shocking Truth About Portion Sizes

Since being overweight increases risk for nine cancers (including breast and prostate cancer), maintaining a healthy weight is one of the best ways to reduce your risk. When I’m counseling clients and giving tips to help them lose weight, one thing always seems to surprise people the most: what a true serving size is.

Did you know the serving size of cooked pasta is ½ cup? Most restaurants will dish out close to 2 cups of pasta, the equivalent of 4 servings. We live in such a portion-large environment that we all (including registered dietitians!) tend to have a distorted view of what a serving size is.

Seeing super-sized restaurant portions causes us to have a skewed perception of how much to serve in our own homes, leading to larger portions all around. Continue reading


Study on Overweight and Mortality: The Cancer Side

Just when New Years resolutions on weight loss are in full swing comes a large new study that suggests being pudgy may actually help us live longer, even as it finds being extremely obese increases our risk of premature death.Weight_Veggies_canstockphoto1468161

While the study has already spurred plenty of controversy among the experts, when it comes to cancer one point remains clear: having excess body fat increases the risk of seven types of cancers, including colorectal, post-menopausal breast, and endometrial. The more people weigh, the higher the risk.

“This study raises interesting questions about obesity and all-cause mortality,  but for cancer risk the evidence is clear,” said AICR Director of Research Susan Higginbotham, PhD, MPH, RD. “Our expert report and its updates show that body fatness increases the risk of several common kinds of cancer.”

The study was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Continue reading