Frequent weighing, small changes, can help young adults avoid that creeping weight gain

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Weight gain tends to creep up on us: studies show that young adults typically gain about a pound and half a year. This might not be noticeable from year to year, but over decades it can add up to significant extra weight if it goes unchecked. Gaining weight can be particularly harmful for young adults, perhaps because it’s tough to lose weight, meaning these individuals live with excess body fat for longer. Excess body fat is linked to many types of cancer and other chronic diseases.

The good news is that young adults may not need dramatic changes to diet and exercise to prevent weight gain, as a study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests. This randomized clinical trial followed nearly 600 young adults ages 18-35 for an average of three years. About half of the participants had BMIs within the normal range, while the other half were already overweight or obese. The study compared two approaches—small, daily changes to diet and physical activity vs. more dramatic diet and exercise changes—to a control group.

Both intervention groups started with ten in-person meetings, while the control group had only one in-person meeting to provide an overview of the study and the issue of weight gain. Read more… “Frequent weighing, small changes, can help young adults avoid that creeping weight gain”

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    Study, Flavonoid-filled Fruits and Veggies May Help You Avoid Weight Gain

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    You probably know fruits and vegetables are packed with all kinds of nutrients, and compounds linked to good health. One of the biggest groups of these compounds or phytochemicals are the flavonoids, and we talk about them a lot here because they’re studied for their role in lowering cancer risk.

    Now comes a large and long-term study that suggests eating plenty of berries, pears, peppers and other fruits and vegetables high in flavonoids may help you avoid weight gain as you age. That can help prevent overweight or obesity, and that’s a big deal for cancer prevention.

    FlavonoidsThe study, published in BMJ, included almost 124,000 people who were part of three population studies that were looking at habits and health. Back in 1986, participants had reported what they were eating, along with other lifestyle habits, such as smoking and activity. They also reported how much they weighed. Every couple years every again filled out questionnaire about their eating habits, using a detailed list of foods, along with weight and illness. Read more… “Study, Flavonoid-filled Fruits and Veggies May Help You Avoid Weight Gain”

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      Study: How the New Nutrition Facts Label May Lead You to Eat More

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      If you saw this label on a food you were about to eat, how would you interpret the serving size? If you’re like most people, you would say that 2/3 cup is the recommended serving for this food, and that common misinterpretation may soon lead you to eat more than you should when the nutrition label serving sizes boost upwards, suggests a recent study published in the journal Appetite

      This could cause the unintended consequence of weight gain. AICR’s first recommendation, maintaining a healthy weight, is one of the most important steps you can take to reduce cancer risk.

      The serving size on the nutrition label – that 2/3 cup – actually represents the amount most people eat in one sitting. And it’s about to change for about one in five food items as part of the FDA plans to revise the label. We wrote about it here. The proposed label will adjust the serving sizes to more accurately represent what people typically eat, which is more than the current serving sizes. For example, the serving size for ice cream would increase from one-half cup to one cup. Read more… “Study: How the New Nutrition Facts Label May Lead You to Eat More”

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