New Year, New Food

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I love finding unusual fruits and vegetables to incorporate into my daily routine – changing up the types of vegetables provides your body with the right balance of nutrients and encourages you to get creative with cooking.

The most recent unique vegetable I’ve incorporated into my meal planning is rutabaga. This lesser known round root vegetable originated as a cross between turnips and cabbage. It is nutty and mildly sweet tasting and can be roasted, sautéed, baked, boiled, mashed, or added to soups and stews. It is a popular dish around the world, with various native preparations. In the Netherlands, it is traditionally served boiled and mashed served with sausages. In Australia, rutabaga is known as swede, and is used in casseroles, stews and soups to enhance flavor.
Read more… “New Year, New Food”

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    Healthy Recipe: Golden Vegan Veggie Balls

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    Holiday cooking doesn’t have to focus on decadent casseroles, pounds of meat, and indulgent desserts. You can boost the delicious, health potential of holiday meals with more plant foods, such as whole grains, beans, and seasonal vegetables. After all, some of the most delicious items on the holiday table—green bean casserole, sweet potatoes, and stuffing—are all about plants.


    If you’re trying to shine the light on plant foods this holiday, try making a plant-based entrée alternative. One of my favorite options is veggie “meatballs”—savory little balls filled with the goodness of beans, grains, vegetables, and herbs.

    Read more… “Healthy Recipe: Golden Vegan Veggie Balls”

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      Few American adults meet fruit and veggie goals, raising cancer risk

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      A new study covering over 300,000 adults from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that few American adults meet the 2015 Dietary Guidelines recommendations for vegetables and fruit. Nationally, about 12% of adults eat enough fruit and a little more than 9% meet the vegetable goal.

      AICR Research shows that eating a plant-based diet with plenty of vegetables and fruit can reduce risk for many cancers. The Dietary Guidelines also link a vegetable and fruit-heavy diet to a lower risk for chronic diseases like heart disease and type 2 diabetes. They recommend 1.5 – 2 cups of fruits and 2-3 cups of vegetables daily for adults.

      The CDC researchers found that women, those with higher income and adults 51 or older were more likely to eat enough vegetables. Hispanics, women and 31-50 year olds most often met the fruit goal.

      There were large differences between states, with West Virginia showing the lowest intake of vegetables (5.8%) and fruit (7.3%) and DC showing highest fruit intake (15.5%) while highest vegetable consumption was reported in Alaska (12%). You can see the statistics for your state here. Read more… “Few American adults meet fruit and veggie goals, raising cancer risk”

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