Study: Eating Lots of Plant Foods Lowers Breast Cancer Risk

The research is pretty clear that staying a healthy weight lowers postmenopausal women’s risk of breast cancer. Now a new study suggests that regularly eating a diet high in the foods that help you stay at that healthy weight – fruits, vegetables and other plant foods – may by itself lower risk of breast cancer.canstockphoto4649115

The link to lower risk was most pronounced for tumors that are not fueled by hormones. These breast cancers are less common, but more challenging to treat.

The study was published yesterday in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Going into the study, researchers looked to get away from individual foods and nutrients and focus on dietary pattern, which looks at the overall types of foods we regularly eat. Almost 100,000 women answered questionnaires about what they ate, along with genetic and other risk factors. Five dietary patterns emerged:

1)    plant based: lots of fruits and vegetables
2)    high-protein, high-fat: lots of meat, eggs, butter and fried foods
3)    high carbohydrate: lots of pasta, bread and convenience foods
4)    ethnic: lots of legumes, soy-based foods, rice and dark green leafy vegetables
5)    salad and wine: high in lettuce with low-fat dressing, fish, wine, coffee and tea Continue reading

Want to Be More Thoughtful, Less Boring? Add a Veggie

Moms who want extra incentive to add vegetables to the family dinner take note: It may make your family think you’re a more thoughtful and better cook, at least according to moms, suggests a new study.

The study, which used an online survey, also found that broccoli, green beans and carrots top the list for the vegetables most commonly served at family meals. Broccoli was the moms’ favorite vegetable and according to them, it’s also the favorite of the oldest child: Corn or broccoli is the vegetable of choice for the youngest.

There’s plenty of health reasons to include vegetables with the family meal – with reducing the risk for weight gain and later cancer risk among them – but this study suggests it may also improve how the family perceives the chef and the meal’s tastiness.

The study was published in the journal Public Health Nutrition. Continue reading

Refrigerator Redo

A refrigerator make-over would be a great way to welcome spring and all the fresh, seasonal produce appearing in grocery stores and farmers markets. Leave winter behind and head to the nearest supermarket produce section.

Stock your fridge with antioxidant-rich fruits, vegetables and whole grains and take your crucial first step toward an energy-boosting, cancer-fighting diet.

AICR is ready to help you get started on your refrigerator redo with our Steps to a Healthy Fridge.   Try it out and let us know how you’re making changes. Send us your photos – before, after or ‘as is’ and we’ll post some here.

You can also tell us the most mysterious food item you’ve found in your fridge.

For inspiration – here’s a fun site with photos of refrigerators and their contents from all over the world.