Five minute chat, a few dollars can up families fruit/veggie intake

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Eating vegetables and fruit are key to a healthy, cancer-protective diet, yet few Americans meet the daily serving recommendations, with low-income consumers finding it especially difficult. But a recent study demonstrated how a brief discussion combined with a $10 voucher incentive could modestly boost families’ vegetable and fruit consumption.

Even a modest improvement in diet is important for cancer and other chronic disease prevention. Independent studies have shown people can live longer and lower their risk for breast and prostate cancers when following more of AICR’s recommendations, including a plant-based diet. Read more… “Five minute chat, a few dollars can up families fruit/veggie intake”

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    Health Talk: How many vegetables should I be eating? What about my kids?

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    Q: I keep seeing recommendations about cups of vegetables, but I’m confused about how many I should be eating. What about my kids?

    A: If you’re like most adults, you should be aiming for 2 to 3 cups of vegetables a day, as seen in the Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern from the Dietary Guidelines. This amount also holds for children ages 9 and older. Targets for children age 8 and under, are less – about 1 to 1.5 cups a day.

    “Cups” of vegetables mostly refers to a portion equal to one measuring cup for raw or cooked vegetables. For lettuce, spinach or other raw leafy vegetables however, two cups count as a cup. A medium carrot, celery stalk and small pepper each count as half a cup. If you don’t want to measure, an average adult fist is a rough guide to a 1-cup portion. So you can aim for one to two fist-size portions of vegetables at lunch and dinner each day. Read more… “Health Talk: How many vegetables should I be eating? What about my kids?”

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      Study: Toddlers who try more veggies less picky years later

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      If you’re the parent of an infant or toddler, you’ve probably given a lot of thought to how you can raise a non-picky eater who enjoys a wide variety of fruits and vegetables and doesn’t overdo it on junk food. Diets rich in colorful fruits and vegetables and low in sugary and energy-dense foods and drinks can help kids (and parents) maintain a healthy weight, prevent cancer as adults and reduce their risk of other chronic diseases.

      Raising kids that prefer healthy foods isn’t easy, but a new study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests strategies that parents can try with their young children that may affect what foods kids enjoy and eat more of as they get older. It joins a growing body of research pointing to the importance of introducing a wide variety of vegetables to children under the age of 2. It also provide new evidence that parents should avoid introducing foods low in nutrients, but high in saturated fat, added sugars, or salt to young children who haven’t yet tasted them.

      This study used data from the NOURISH trial, a randomized control trial that began in Australia in 2008. The original study looked at whether providing new mothers with guidance on feeding and parenting practices affected outcomes as children got older. In this new study, researchers analyzed data from 340 mother-child pairs to see whether the amount of fruits, vegetables, and noncore (low-nutrient) foods tried by 14-month olds affected their preference for and intake of these foods, food fussiness, and weight about two and half years later. Read more… “Study: Toddlers who try more veggies less picky years later”

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