Study: Kids’ peers may help them eat more veggies

Kid eating carrotsWhat kids think their peers are eating may matter for how many vegetables they’re eating, suggests a new study. The study was published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity and could have an impact for cancer prevention decades later. Healthy eating habits can reduce risk of kids being overweight adults, and excess body fat is a cause of ten cancers for adults.

For this small study, 143 children ages 6-11 were recruited from North-West England and brought in individually for what they thought was a study of game-playing ability.

Children were shown a participant information sheet of six fictitious previous participants that included general information as well as the amount of carrots each child ate during the session. The carrots column either read “all” (high intake group), “none” (low intake group); the column was blank or omitted in two control groups. Children were also presented with a bowl. The bowl contained one carrot in the high intake group, was nearly full of carrots in the low intake group, and was filled with pens for the control groups. Continue reading

Think Vegetables are Boring? For Spring Veggies, Try This

If vegetables aren’t the all-star of your meal, and you – like many of my clients – think of vegetables as bland or boring, think again. canstockphoto24567903

With the spring weather upon us, this is a great time of year to increase your intake of fresh seasonal veggies. Vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients that protect your health, including reducing your risk of cancer and heart disease. While you may know this, rather than eating vegetables because you feel like you should eat them, start eating them because you enjoy them.

Below are ten of my favorite ways to flavor your spring-time veggies. Continue reading

Study: Daily Fruits and Veggies for Fewer Cancer Deaths, Longer Life

If you need another reason to grab an apple today, a new study may get you inspired. The study suggests that eating just a few fruits and vegetables a day reduces the risk of dying from cancer and an earlier death. And the more produce people ate, the lower their risk of dying during the course of the study.fresh fruits and vegetables isolated on a white background

The study was published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

From AICR’s report along with other research, there is already an established link between consuming high amounts of fruits and vegetables are reduced risk of certain cancers. This study both strengthens and adds to the research by focusing on mortality, from cancer, along with heart disease and any cause.

The study included approximately 65,000 participants, ages 35 or older, who represent the population of England. They had answered questions annually about how many and what types of fruit and vegetables they had eaten, as well as other health habits.

After an average of 8 years, the people who were eating seven or more fruits and vegetables each day had a 33 percent reduced risk of dying from any cause compared to their non-produce eating counterparts. Even consuming one to three fruits and vegetables a day reduced risk of death by about 10 percent, compared to those who ate none. The link was even stronger when excluding those who died during the first year of the study, which may have been due to illness. Continue reading