Study: Daily Fruits and Veggies for Fewer Cancer Deaths, Longer Life

If you need another reason to grab an apple today, a new study may get you inspired. The study suggests that eating just a few fruits and vegetables a day reduces the risk of dying from cancer and an earlier death. And the more produce people ate, the lower their risk of dying during the course of the study.fresh fruits and vegetables isolated on a white background

The study was published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

From AICR’s report along with other research, there is already an established link between consuming high amounts of fruits and vegetables are reduced risk of certain cancers. This study both strengthens and adds to the research by focusing on mortality, from cancer, along with heart disease and any cause.

The study included approximately 65,000 participants, ages 35 or older, who represent the population of England. They had answered questions annually about how many and what types of fruit and vegetables they had eaten, as well as other health habits.

After an average of 8 years, the people who were eating seven or more fruits and vegetables each day had a 33 percent reduced risk of dying from any cause compared to their non-produce eating counterparts. Even consuming one to three fruits and vegetables a day reduced risk of death by about 10 percent, compared to those who ate none. The link was even stronger when excluding those who died during the first year of the study, which may have been due to illness. Continue reading


Study: Eating Lots of Plant Foods Lowers Breast Cancer Risk

The research is pretty clear that staying a healthy weight lowers postmenopausal women’s risk of breast cancer. Now a new study suggests that regularly eating a diet high in the foods that help you stay at that healthy weight – fruits, vegetables and other plant foods – may by itself lower risk of breast cancer.canstockphoto4649115

The link to lower risk was most pronounced for tumors that are not fueled by hormones. These breast cancers are less common, but more challenging to treat.

The study was published yesterday in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Going into the study, researchers looked to get away from individual foods and nutrients and focus on dietary pattern, which looks at the overall types of foods we regularly eat. Almost 100,000 women answered questionnaires about what they ate, along with genetic and other risk factors. Five dietary patterns emerged:

1)    plant based: lots of fruits and vegetables
2)    high-protein, high-fat: lots of meat, eggs, butter and fried foods
3)    high carbohydrate: lots of pasta, bread and convenience foods
4)    ethnic: lots of legumes, soy-based foods, rice and dark green leafy vegetables
5)    salad and wine: high in lettuce with low-fat dressing, fish, wine, coffee and tea Continue reading


Want to Be More Thoughtful, Less Boring? Add a Veggie

Moms who want extra incentive to add vegetables to the family dinner take note: It may make your family think you’re a more thoughtful and better cook, at least according to moms, suggests a new study.

The study, which used an online survey, also found that broccoli, green beans and carrots top the list for the vegetables most commonly served at family meals. Broccoli was the moms’ favorite vegetable and according to them, it’s also the favorite of the oldest child: Corn or broccoli is the vegetable of choice for the youngest.

There’s plenty of health reasons to include vegetables with the family meal – with reducing the risk for weight gain and later cancer risk among them – but this study suggests it may also improve how the family perceives the chef and the meal’s tastiness.

The study was published in the journal Public Health Nutrition. Continue reading