6,000 Cancer Deaths Linked to Sugary Drinks

pouring colaSugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) continue to make headlines: this week, a report that these drinks are associated with 180,000 deaths due to chronic diseases in adults worldwide every year.

AICR recommends avoiding sugary drinks because the AICR/WCRF expert report and its updates find strong evidence that sugary beverages cause weight gain, overweight and obesity.

According to the researchers, who presented their study at an American Heart Association Scientific Session, sugar-sweetened beverages contribute worldwide to 6,000 cancer deaths. They linked sugary drink consumption to 25,000 Americans’ deaths in 2010. This, as of now, is an unpublished study.

The researchers calculated the numbers of deaths related to SSB by looking at changes in SSB consumption in each country and it’s association with changes in body mass index Continue reading


Does Vegetarian Equal Healthful?

RatatouilleMany people equate vegetarian eating with healthfulness. But just how much do vegetarian diets affect people’s health?

This past week, I attended the International Congress on Vegetarian Nutrition, a conference exploring the research on vegetarian diets and health, including aging, obesity, cancer, type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases.

We enjoyed a lot of lively discussion on these topics – both areas of agreement and those that are controversial. Here are a few of my take-aways from the conference: Continue reading


Study: More Magnesium Links to Lower Insulin Levels

Spinach_canstockphoto0556156Spinach — the dark green leafy source of Popeye’s superhuman strength — is abundant in many nutrients, including magnesium. A new study suggests that diets higher in magnesium are associated with lower blood levels of glucose and insulin, which are often elevated in people with type 2 diabetes.

Research now shows that people with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of certain cancers, including kidney, pancreatic and colorectal.

The study was published online last month in The Journal of Nutrition.

Study researchers analyzed data from approximately 53,000 non-diabetic European men and women from 15 studies who were part of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) study. The individual studies had collected dietary data through questionnaires, interviews, and/or food diaries along with glucose and insulin levels after participants had not eaten for at least 8 hours. Continue reading