Analysis: Can You Be Obese and (Metabolically) Healthy? Probably Not

Can you be obese and healthy — at least metabolically healthy? Probably not, suggests the latest review of the research, which finds even people who are metabolically healthy and obese are at increased risk for an earlier death and risk for cardiovascular disease.bigstock-Fat-man-Isolated-on-white-He-41560129

The study — published in the Annals of Internal Medicine — did not look at cancer specifically, but metabolic health is a big topic in cancer risk these days.

Many signs of poor metabolic health are factors for increased cancer risk, as well as type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

If you read this blog you probably know that the heavier you are, the more your risk increases for many cancers, including postmenopausal breast, colorectal, and pancreatic. And obesity brings metabolic issues. Continue reading


6,000 Cancer Deaths Linked to Sugary Drinks

pouring colaSugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) continue to make headlines: this week, a report that these drinks are associated with 180,000 deaths due to chronic diseases in adults worldwide every year.

AICR recommends avoiding sugary drinks because the AICR/WCRF expert report and its updates find strong evidence that sugary beverages cause weight gain, overweight and obesity.

According to the researchers, who presented their study at an American Heart Association Scientific Session, sugar-sweetened beverages contribute worldwide to 6,000 cancer deaths. They linked sugary drink consumption to 25,000 Americans’ deaths in 2010. This, as of now, is an unpublished study.

The researchers calculated the numbers of deaths related to SSB by looking at changes in SSB consumption in each country and it’s association with changes in body mass index Continue reading


Does Vegetarian Equal Healthful?

RatatouilleMany people equate vegetarian eating with healthfulness. But just how much do vegetarian diets affect people’s health?

This past week, I attended the International Congress on Vegetarian Nutrition, a conference exploring the research on vegetarian diets and health, including aging, obesity, cancer, type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases.

We enjoyed a lot of lively discussion on these topics – both areas of agreement and those that are controversial. Here are a few of my take-aways from the conference: Continue reading