More Moving, Less Sitting May Protect Cancer Survivors from Premature Death

Evidence is clear that physical activity lowers the risk of getting colorectal Sneakers_dreamstime_14295723cancer. But for those who are diagnosed with this cancer, a new study suggests that survivors who spend more time walking and less time sitting – both before and after diagnosis – may have a longer life.

The study was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology this week.

Study researchers used data from participants who were part of a large cancer prevention study that started in 1992. Fifteen years later, almost 2,300 of the participants were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. When they entered the study and after the cancer diagnosis, participants filled out questionnaires about how active they were and how much time they spent sitting per week. Continue reading


Diet Plays a Role in Colon Cancer Reccurence: New Study

It was only in the past few decades that research found diet plays a role in preventing colon cancer. Now, a study suggests that colon cancer patients whose diets are relatively low in starchy foods and carbohydrates have a lower risk of recurrence and death compared to those eating a high carb diet.

The findings were published online yesterday in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The study builds on the authors’ earlier research that observed a link between an overall pattern of eating and recurrence among colon cancer patients. That study found patients who ate the most fats, meats, carbs and sugary desserts — a Western diet — were three times more likely to have their cancer recur compared to those whose diets were least Western.

The current study focused on teasing apart which part of the Western diet might most contribute to the effect. Continue reading


Higher Weight Links to Earlier Death for Some Breast Cancer Survivors

Research is clear that obesity increases the risk of developing breast cancer. Now, a large study suggests that women who are overweight or obese when they are diagnosed with the most common form of breast cancer have the greatest risk of an earlier death and recurrence, even when undergoing optimal treatment.

The study was published early online in the journal CANCER. Here’s the abstract.

The link was seen among women who had hormone-receptor positive breast cancer, which make up about two-thirds of breast cancers.

In all, the study included almost 7,000 women who went through treatment. The researchers pulled data from three National Cancer Institute trials that were studying the effects of chemotherapy, tamoxifen and/or other treatments on women with breast cancer. Their breast cancers ranged from the early stage to the later stage III, where the cancer could have spread to nearby lymph nodes.

The largest of the three trials tracked the women’s health for an average of 8 years; the other two followed the women for 14 years. Continue reading