Healthy Weight, Diet, and Ovarian Cancer Survival

Ovarian cancer is among the most deadly women’s cancers. That’s because its symptoms, such as abdominal bloating, are difficult to diagnose until it has progressed to a late stage. Only 44 percent of ovarian cancer survivors live 5 years past diagnosis.

Unveiling #1 - Covered & ConfidentBut results of a new study of post-menopausal women in the Women’s Health Initiative trial unveiled this week at our research conference associate higher diet quality index score in combination with physical activity with greater survival after diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Researchers at the University of Arizona Cancer Center presented these results in a poster at our conference.

The results are not yet published and has not yet gone through the peer-reviewed process.

Study author Tracy Crane, MS, RD, said of the ┬ástudy, “This secondary analysis supports the ongoing LIVES study, the largest-ever randomized controlled trial (RTC) to investigate the effects of diet, weight and physical activity on ovarian cancer survival.”

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From the Field: Working with Survivors for Stronger Bones

dreamstime_xs_12022463Yesterday at our research conference, one popular session focused on bone health for cancer survivors. More than 40 million adults in the US have or are at high risk for osteoporosis, a bone weakening disease.

Often due to some cancer therapies, survivors are at higher risk for bone loss and osteoporosis than the general population.

Breast and prostate cancer treatments may cause low estrogen or androgen levels, two hormones important for strong bones.

Between sessions, I talked with several oncology dietitians about how they work with survivors on bone health in their centers and clinics. While not unanimous, most RDs said their patients are very aware of their increased risk for bone loss and receive DEXA screening — a test for bone mineral density — and treatment, including diet and lifestyle prescriptions as well as appropriate medications. Continue reading


For Cancer Researchers, A Social Media Wake-Up Call

This year, AICR is trying something different at our Annual Research Conference on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer next week. Something we hope will act as a clarion call for cancer researcher and health professionals.canstockphoto6433880

We’ve all gone to conferences where the social media engagement is limited to attendees being encouraged to tweet their experiences. But at a breakfast session first thing in the morning on November 8th, AICR is hosting a special panel to discuss how scientists can engage in meaningful conversations with the public using social media.

There is an urgent need for responsible, evidence-based cancer information in social media, and unfortunately this need, in many cases, is now being met by self-appointed health “gurus” who make unverifiable or patently false claims. Now is the time for informed, rational voices to enter the furious ongoing discussion. We must provide context and sober, well-informed resources and information.

Social media gives scientists and practitioners with a means of sharing their work and engaging in a meaningful two-way discussion with a wider audience. Continue reading