Trial Shows Vitamin D, Calcium Supplements Don’t Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk

For those who have had possible precancerous growths removed from their colon/rectum — common among adults — taking vitamin D and/or calcium supplements does not reduce the risk of developing further growths, finds a randomized study reported in the New England Journal Of Medicine. The multi-year trial adds to the evidence that supplements Composition With Variety Of Drug Pills And Dietary Supplementsdo not protect against colorectal cancers.

While there are many reasons to take supplements, AICR recommends not to rely on supplements for cancer protection.

The 2,259 people in this study all had colorectal abnormal growths, called adenomas or polyps. Some of these growths on the lining of the colon or rectum could eventually lead to colorectal cancer, which is why they are commonly removed.

Within four months of having the polyps removed, the participants (who were 45 to 75 years old) were placed into a group where he/she took a daily dietary supplement of vitamin D, calcium, both or neither. The study was blinded so neither the researchers nor participants knew what they were taking. And when they joined the study, everyone had normal levels of calcium or vitamin D.  Continue reading

Study: Vitamin E from Food, Not Supplements, May Lower Women’s Lung Cancer Risk

Although not smoking is by far the best way to reduce your risk of lung cancer, about 1 in 5 women who get lung cancer are nonsmokers according to the National Cancer Institute.

Little is currently known about the role of nutrition in preventing lung cancer in female Vit E & Supplementsnonsmokers, but research recently published in the International Journal of Cancer suggests that getting enough vitamin E from foods may lower risk for nonsmoking women, especially those exposed to secondhand smoke. However, vitamin E supplements may increase lung cancer risk in these groups.

This study’s authors used data from 65,000 Chinese women who had never smoked and followed them for an average of 12 years to see if they developed lung cancer. They found that women who consumed enough vitamin E from foods to meet Chinese guidelines at the start of the study had a lower risk of developing lung cancer compared to women who did not consume enough vitamin E. Continue reading

What Foods have Folate? Which have Selenium?

The hot topic that kicked off our research conference today was about how some selenium, folic acid and other micronutrients decrease cancer risk, but too much may actually increase risk. It’s delightfully termed the “Goldilocks Effect” and Glen wrote about it earlier.

All the scientists stressed that certain amounts of micronutrients show cancer protection. Supplements can give you too much. But a healthy amount of foods cannot give you the high amounts under study for harm. And these foods are loaded with plenty of other nutrients and phytochemicals linked with cancer protection and good health.

So what foods can give you selenium and folate? Here’s a few:

Folate_Selenium foods combo_small