Cut the Sugar, Boost Your Beverage for Cancer Prevention

iced tea peaches dreamstime_xs_20982385_350I’ve been thinking about how sugary drinks affect Americans’ health lately.  Recent findings published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that sugar sweetened beverages promotes weight gain in children and adults. And I was preparing for an interview on foods I avoid/limit in my diet – like sugary drinks.

AICR’s expert report and updates also find that these drinks cause weight gain and obesity. And excess body fat is one of the causes of 7 different cancers, including post-menopausal breast and colorectal.

These drinks are everywhere and they’re inexpensive. It seems that America is hooked on liquid sugar and that’s one significant driving force in our obesity epidemic. Continue reading


The Latest Trend: Fewer Beverage Calories But Still A Soda per Day

Americans of all ages are sipping fewer calories from sugary sodas, energy drinks and other sweet beverages compared to over a decade ago, but we are still drinking the equivalent of about a can of soda per day on average, according to a new study.canstockphoto13083076

Those calories — about 150 of them — are important for cancer prevention because AICR’s expert report and its updates found that sugary drinks lead to weight gain. And excess body fat links to increased risk of seven cancers.

The study was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Study researchers used data from approximately 51,000 kids, teens and adults that made up a representative sample of the US population. In a large government study, participants reported everything they drank (and ate) during a 24-hour period.

When the researchers looked at sugary beverage consumption between 1999 and 2010, they found a drop in the amount of calories both youths and adults were drinking. The 2 to 19 year olds were drinking on average 155 calories per day, which is 68 fewer calories than in the 1999-2000 survey. Adults were consuming an average of 151 calories each day, a drop of 45 calories compared to twelve years earlier. Continue reading


Five ‘Real Things’ Coca-Cola Can Do To Address Obesity

Boy drinkingCoca-Cola has unveiled a new ad campaign they say is designed to be part of the conversation about obesity. First up: an ad that touts their 180 beverages that are no or low calorie, like Dasani water and diet sodas.

If this means Coke plans to focus on these drinks and dedicate their advertising dollars (U.S. and globally) towards promoting water, unsweetened tea and other zero calorie drinks, that could be a helpful step toward reducing obesity and preventing many cases of cancer in the United States. Continue reading