Inactivity Links to One in Ten Cancers Worldwide

Worldwide, one in ten cases of both breast cancers and colon cancers is due to a lack of physical activity, with inactivity as much to blame for the major chronic diseases as smoking or obesity, finds a major new report published today in The Lancet.

The study’s cancer preventability figures expand the estimates released at last year’s AICR Research Conference, which linked inactivity in the United States to three of every ten colon cancers and two of every ten breast cancer cases.

In this study, researchers quantified for the first time the global impact of physical inactivity, suggesting that inactivity is responsible for almost 9 percent of all deaths worldwide.

The findings are one in a series of six (free) papers published today in The Lancet.

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Don’t Just Sit There: The Case Against Sitting Gets (Even) Stronger

A new study adds to the mounting evidence that the kind of prolonged sitting most of us do every day is killing us. That’s the bad news.

The good news — which this new study in the journal Diabetes Care also demonstrates — is that simply breaking up those long hours of sitting with a little walking can help.

Last November, at AICR’s Research Conference, we highlighted exciting research that measured several common indicators of cancer risk (like insulin resistance, waist circumference and inflammation) and found that adding even brief activity breaks decreased these indicators in ways linked to lower cancer risk. Continue reading


Watching Lots of TV Increases Risk of Early Mortality

If you were to see a sign prompting you to take the stairs instead of the elevator, would you do it? A lot of people apparently would, suggests a new study. The study, featured in today’s Cancer Research Update, looked at the effects of seeing the image developed by New York City government officials (right).

Through a lot of observing and counting, researchers found that people immediately began switching from the elevators to the stairs after posting the sign. And more people were still climbing stairs nine months later.

Along with its main finding, the study illustrates ways we can build physical activity into the day. That’s important because being active for 30-minutes or more every day reduces the risk of several cancers, along with other chronic diseases.

But moving throughout the day may influence our health beyond that isolated activity time: A growing body of research now suggests there are health perils of not moving – being sedentary. Continue reading