2014 Trends for Cancer Prevention You Can Do Today

Last week, Colby wrote about trends in cancer research. Here, I’d like to weigh in on trends to lower cancer risk – not predictions, but habits I’d like to see everyone do and therefore become a top trend.bigstock-Bitten-Apple-And-Pedometer-41281678

1. Track your health-related habits.

Tracking helps you be aware of what, how much and when you are eating or exercising. You can then identify what changes you want to make and what would be realistic.

Use whatever method works best for you. Try paper and pencil – get a small notebook that fits in your briefcase, purse or pocket. After each meal or snack, write down everything you eat and, depending on your goal, how much you ate. There are also many phone apps or online programs that calculate calories, nutrients or other analyses. Continue reading


Holiday Hang-Ups: Staying Healthy in the Workplace

You sit all day. The vending machine’s full of sugary soda. Sandy from Accounting keeps a heaping bowl of fun-size candy at her desk, which you walk past on your way to and from the copier.

bigstock-an-apple-is-on-a-computer-keyb-44723527The workplace is where you spend most of your waking time, a closed environment filled with constant inducements to move less and eat more. At holiday time, those inducements multiply. Today, more and more Human Resources professionals are taking steps to create healthier workplaces, because they know that healthier employees are happier — and, yes, more productive.

Here at AICR, we’ve taken a series of steps to ensure we’re practicing what we preach. Here’s just a few of the ideas we’ve instituted:

  • The AICR Walking Club meets three times a week at lunchtime for a brisk walk around the neighborhood. The group activity helps members motivate one another to get and stay active. We’re looking into a running group for those employees who want to kick up their activity even more. Continue reading


Preventing Endometrial Cancer: Talking with Elisa Bandera

The new AICR/World Cancer Research Fund report on preventing endometrial cancer was published today – the report found obesity, coffee, and activity links to risk. The report analyzed the global research on diet, activity, and weight to the risk of endometrial cancer. Here, Elisa Bandera, MD, PhD, the panel lead of this CUP report and an epidemiologist at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, talks about the report’s findings and what it means.Bandera_Elisa_small

Q: This is the first systematic update of the research on lifestyle and endometrial cancer risk since 2007. Overall, what’s new here?

A: For the update, we now have more prospective data for dietary factors and interesting associations emerged with coffee consumption and glycemic load. Coffee consumption was associated with reduced risk while glycemic load increased risk. There is also growing evidence that longer sitting time increases endometrial cancer risk.

Q: But the research for sitting time – sedentary livingwas not strong enough to make a conclusion.

A: There were only three studies at this time but they all suggested increased risk. We could not be certain based on the limited data that the association was independent of BMI. However, sitting time has been emerging as an important risk factor for other cancers, independent of physical activity. In other words, it is not sufficient to go to the gym three times a week. We have to remember to get up out of our chairs and move and avoid extended period of sittings in front of the television or the computer.

Q: How much more research is there now on endometrial cancer prevention compared to the last report?

A: There are more studies, but particularly more prospective studies evaluating dietary factors, which were lacking in the first report.  Still, only few prospective studies have evaluated some of the dietary exposures and endometrial cancer risk compared to the number of studies that have evaluated them in relation to breast or colorectal cancers.

Q: Why is having prospective data so important?

A: The previous report’s conclusions were based on mainly findings from case-control studies, which are generally considered weaker than cohort or prospective studies. Continue reading