Top Four Travel Tips to Keep You Eating Healthy

End-of-summer vacations are here and it’s time to unwind, relax and enjoy the sunshine. I love traveling so I know first-hand that trips can be a real challenge when it comes to eating healthy.

For me and many of my patients, travel means more dining out and different foods. Restaurant meals are almost always higher in calories, fat and salt than meals prepared at home, making it easy to gain weight when dining out multiple times per day. Since obesity is one of the primary factors contributing to increased cancer risk, maintaining a healthy weight is one of the best ways to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases.

Here are my top tips to stay healthy and avoid weight gain on vacation:

1. Pack snacks.
Even with great intentions, if it’s been more than 5 hours since your last meal and you’re really hungry, you’re more likely to impulsively eat something unhealthy like those cookies at the rest stop. And it’s just so easy to eat too much, too quickly. Avoid this by having a small snack between meals that are many hours apart so you can make smart choices later. I always bring multiple pre-portioned snack bags in my purse or suitcase when traveling.

My favorite travel snacks: Continue reading

Survey: Diners – Especially Women – Using Posted Menu Calories

If you spot calorie information on your restaurant menu, does it help you decide what to order?

For about six of every ten adults living in select states, that calorie information does help them decide what to order. At least sometimes, that is, with about one of every ten diners using that nutrition information for every purchase, according to a new government survey.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study comes from residents of 17 states that have menu labeling and completed a 2012 phone survey about it. In 2010, a federal law required chain restaurants to display the calories of their menu items, and some states started those requirements quickly.  Given that some studies show Americans eat up to a quarter of our calories at restaurants, using calorie information may help restaurant-goers make healthier choices. That, in turn, can reduce cancer risk.

Respondents were only counted if they visited fast food or chain restaurants and noticed the menu labeling. Among the findings: Continue reading