Five Things to Look for at our 25th Research Conference

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AICR’S 25TH research conference starts on Monday, and we are in the midst of final preparations. I am looking forward to welcoming everyone at our opening session. We have a packed program across three days, with a wealth of information.

Here are some highlights you don’t want to miss, whether joining the conference virtually or in person.

1. Presentations from experts in their field. The topics cover a wide range, from the microbiome to exercise during cancer treatment. We’ll be sending out highlights on our blog so – if you haven’t already – sign up for this blog to get the news. Read more… “Five Things to Look for at our 25th Research Conference”

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    SNPs, Activity, Vitamin D Research, Highlights from AICR Award Winners at ObesityWeek

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    Congratulations to this year’s ObesityWeek Conference poster winners.

    The annual conference, held this year in New Orleans, focuses on the basic science, treatment, and prevention of obesity. It is an important topic because obesity links to several types of cancer, including post-menopausal breast, advanced prostate, and colorectal.

    Highlighted below are three of the winners of the AICR research poster competition, which was announced yesterday. The research focused on how genetics, physical activity, and nutrients influence cancer risk, treatment, and survival.

    Note: These poster findings have not been published and have not been subjected to the peer-reviewed process. Read more… “SNPs, Activity, Vitamin D Research, Highlights from AICR Award Winners at ObesityWeek”

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      Can your kitchen layout cut your calories and help with cancer prevention?

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      Can seeing food in your kitchen and easy serving make a difference in how much you eat? A study authored by an architect and an environmental psychologist published this month suggests that may be an unintended outcome of the popular open kitchen design in homes.

      That’s important because how many calories you eat affects your weight, and that affects cancer risk.

      Published in Environment and Behavior the authors looked at how much the open plan – easy to see the food and get to the buffet – affected the amount of food participants (57 university students) ate, compared to a closed plan. For one dinner they ate in the open plan, for another they ate in the closed plan. They used a university food and dining research lab and made it mimic a closed plan by putting decorative wooden screens to block the diners’ view of food. Read more… “Can your kitchen layout cut your calories and help with cancer prevention?”

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