Health-e-Recipe Champion: Brussels Sprouts Beat Brownies

We all know Brussels sprouts are healthy. They’re an excellent source of vitamin A, C, K, fiber and folate. As a cruciferous vegetable, they’re rich in carotenoids and glucosinolates, phytochemicals that both show an ability to reduce inflammation, neutralize carcinogens and control abnormal cell growth in lab studies.

Brussles and Brownies

Brussels sprouts are always humble champions.

But no one ever said they were better than brownies…until now. After 4 weeks, 16 recipes and over 1300 votes, the most controversial vegetable has been declared the winner of AICR’s Recipe Contest. Competing against colorful salads, spicy soups, classic comfort foods and even our famous brownies, it definitely earned its spot as our 500th Health-e-Recipe.

So take the challenge, and try out the winning recipe for yourself. Head over to our Facebook page to tell us what you think and you could win a New American Plate cookbook, filled with tasty, healthy recipes to try. Continue reading


Study: Eating High Amounts of Fats May Increase Risk of Certain Breast Tumors

For both pre- and postmenopausal breast cancers, the many studies looking on whether dietary fat matters has resulted in no clear conclusions. Now comes a study from Italy suggesting that it does for certain types of breast tumors, including the most common type.Fat, Fat and Fat

The study suggests that consuming high amounts of total fat, and saturated fats specifically, links to increased risk of breast tumors fueled by the hormones estrogen and progesterone. About three quarters of US breast tumors are estrogen-receptor positive (ER+). The majority of those also grow in response to progesterone.

The increased risk was most pronounced for high amounts of saturated fat, the type of fat from burgers, butter and primarily animal sources.

Here’s the study abstract, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

This is one study, and it will be added to the body of evidence on breast cancer prevention in AICR/WCRF’s Continuous Update Project (CUP). In the latest CUP report, there was not enough evidence on total dietary fat to make a conclusion for pre- or postmenopausal cancers. Continue reading


Chicken Wears Green for St. Patty’s

chicken-and-cabbage cropped3 This week our new report on ovarian cancer means that there are now eight cancers linked to obesity. Our Health-e-Recipe for Chicken Baked with Cabbage and Leek is a delicious way to prepare a satisfying low-calorie meal that also fits St. Patrick’s Day.

Cruciferous vegetables like cabbage and broccoli contain potent cancer-fighting phytochemicals.Savoy and Napa varieties of cabbage have crinkly leaves and are more tender to chew than regular green cabbage. Yet they still pack healthy sulforaphane (an isothiocyanate compound), indoles and flavonoids – compounds that may protect against cancer. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family, too.

Leeks are a kind of onion and contribute protective allium compounds to this dish. With thyme and Spanish paprika, all of these ingredients blend deliciously with chicken while fortifying your health. Serve over brown rice with a wedge of fresh lemon, if desired.

For more excellent cancer-preventive recipes, visit the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.