Study: How Your Colleagues, Family and Friends May Impact Weight Loss

With all the weight loss support groups out there, it’s no surprise that having support can make a difference when it comes to eating healthier and exercising. A new study now suggests that coworkers, friends and family can undermine weight loss or increase it over two years, depending upon their support.Lowsection of two businesspeople walking up stairs with bags in

The study is important for cancer prevention – along with overall health – because overweight and obesity increases risk of eight cancers, including colorectal and postmenopausal breast.

Published in Obesity, the study included 633 high-school employees who were participating in a weight gain prevention study. About a third of the participants were overweight and another quarter were obese.

At the start, participants were weighed and then answered questions about how supportive or unsupportive their friends, family and colleagues were about their diet and exercise behaviors. Continue reading


By 2030, Top Cancer Death Causes Shift, Many Preventable

A study making news this week suggests that the leading types of cancers diagnosed and causes of death will shuffle in the coming years — with pancreatic cancer climbing to the second leading cause of death. Yet even as the top cancers shift by 2030, the research underscores the importance of preventive strategies, many of which will reduce risk for other chronic diseases.apple, tape measure, scale, stethoscope

AICR research suggests that for the 12 most common US cancers, about one third are preventable by changes to our diet, weight, and activity. Not smoking and other preventive strategies will prevent even more.

For the new study, published in Cancer Research, researchers projected cancer incidence and deaths for 2020 and 2030.

Study authors projected incidence for  the 12 most common cancers for men and 13 for women. For cancer mortality they looked at the 14 deadliest cancers for men and 16 for women. They took into account changing demographics, incidence and death rates. Continue reading


Analysis: Obesity Links to Earlier Mortality for Breast Cancer Survivors

A new study involving the emerging research on lifestyle’s role in breast cancer survivorship suggests that obesity — both before and after a breast cancer diagnosis — is associated with earlier death from cancer or other causes, compared to women at a healthy weight. Survivor

The paper was published yesterday in the Annals of Oncology. It adds to a complex and relatively new area of research: what survivors can do to lengthen life and stay healthy.

In a major report on breast cancer survivorship due this Fall, World Cancer Research Fund International’s Continuous Update Project (CUP) expert panel will consider this latest paper as it works to shape official recommendations for cancer survivors. AICR is the US member of World Cancer Research Fund International.

The Annals of Oncology paper was written by a team of scientists involved in the CUP, including Anne McTiernan, MD, PhD, Director of the Prevention Center at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. The paper found that “increased body size is significantly related to survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer…” said Dr. McTiernan. But the findings are not proof, she says, more research is needed. Continue reading