Resistant Starch May Reduce Red-Meat Colorectal Cancer Risk

Eating high amounts of red meat increase risk of colorectal cancer while fiber-filled food reduces the risk, AICR research shows. Now comes a study that offers one possible explanation for both links, finding that diets high in red meat and a type of non-digestable fiber have opposite effects on a group of genetic molecules.Chuckwagon Chili Con Carne

The study was published in Cancer Prevention Research.

Study researchers focused on a type of fiber called resistant starch. Our bodies don’t digest resistant starch in the small intestine. Then in the gut, bacteria convert resistant starch into the compound butyrate. In lab studies, this compound protects against colon cancer.

For the study, 23 participants, ages 50 to 75, switched between two types of diets. In one diet each person was given 300 grams — about 10 ounces — of raw lean red meat a day. That’s about the equivalent of a cooked 8 ounce burger. The other diet had the same red-meat content plus a butyrate resistant starch formulation. Each person was on one diet for four weeks then after a four-week washout period, switched to the second diet for four weeks. Continue reading


Treat Dad to Brazilian Chicken

brazilian-chicken cropped2Even the pickiest Dad will enjoy the unique combination of cancer-preventive ingredients in our Health-e-Recipe for Brazilian Chicken with Black Beans. It’s a hearty alternative to red or processed meat on Father’s Day.

Red or processed meat can increase risk of colorectal cancer, according to AICR’s Continuous Update Report findings. So combining chicken with delicious black beans in this recipe yields 32 grams of protein, balanced with five different vegetables. The Brazilian flavor comes from nutmeg, fresh orange, parsley and cayenne pepper.

Serve it up with brown rice or another whole grain, plus a salad of dark leafy greens, tomatoes and carrots, dressed with olive oil-balsamic vinaigrette and topped with some chopped avocado to continue the South American theme.

Find more excellent cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Study: More Veggies and Fewer Calories May Help Slow Global Warming

At the same time that global warming is making news, a study suggests that eating more fruits, vegetables and nuts and less meat and alcohol — with fewer calories —  can reduce greenhouse gas emission by almost 20 percent, compared to the average diet. Many of the dietary patterns identified as environmentally healthy align with AICR’s recommendations for cancer prevention.Carbon footprint

The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, is one of the first that takes into account foods nutrition along with its environmental impact.

Last month, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) released estimates showing that greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture was on the rise.

This study used greenhouse gas emissions related to farming and production as a measure of a food’s environmental impact. That includes methane produced by cows and fertilizers applied to crops.

For the study, researchers analyzed the diets of almost 2,000 French adults who were part of a nationally representative diet survey. Researchers categorized the foods into groups, calculating how its nutrients and calories contributed to a person’s overall daily diet. They also looked at how much the foods cost. Continue reading