Pleasing Pea Soup

super-split-pea-soup croppedHot, filling and healthy, our Health-e-Recipe for Super Split Pea Soup is a great dish to ward off wintry chills.

Peas are a legume, like dry beans and lentils. Legumes have plenty of cancer-fighting fiber (a robust 17 grams per serving in this recipe).

All legumes contain protein without fat, so they are a great way to cut back on meat while still getting good nutrition. You get 21 grams of protein per serving of this soup’s combination of peas and chicken broth.

Herbs and vegetables, including onion, carrots and potatoes, round out Super Split Pea Soup with protective phytochemicals. Serve it up with a hunk of crusty whole-grain bread and freeze the leftovers to enjoy on other chilly winter days.

Find more delicious cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Is My Christmas Ham a Processed Meat?

Simply put? Yep.

“Processed meat” is any meat that’s preserved by salting, smoking or curing, or by adding chemical preservatives. That means sausage, bacon, cold cuts like pastrami and salami, hot dogs and, yes, ham.bigstock-Dinner-Festive-4350476

Why does it matter whether or not ham counts as processed meat? Because the evidence on processed meat is different than the evidence on red meat, so our recommendations are different, too.

AICR’s expert report and its updates have consistently and convincingly shown that diets high in red meat are a cause of colorectal cancer. This is why we recommend moderating red meat intake to keep it below 18 ounces (cooked) per week. In studies, consumption at or below this threshold is not associated with increased risk.

When it comes to processed meat, the evidence is just as consistent and convincing — but a good deal more stark. That’s because the evidence on processed meat suggests that no “safe threshold” exists. A modest increase in risk for colorectal cancer is seen with even occasional consumption of processed meat, and continues to rise as consumption increases. Continue reading


Heart Healthy Living: It’s Also Cancer Prevention Living

Don’t be surprised if the next time you get your cholesterol tested, your doctor talks to you about a plant-based diet – vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes. New guidelines released yesterday for heart healthy living highlight that how you eat and move for heart health are what we know can also help you prevent cancer. dreamstime_xs_32027497

These new evidence-based  guidelines for preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) include lifestyle, drug and obesity management recommendations. They come from expert task forces convened by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

For the first time, the recommendations for heart healthy eating focus on overall eating patterns, rather than just saturated fat or sodium. That’s good news, because examples they give, such as DASH and Mediterranean diets, are plant-based eating patterns. They also align with AICR’s recommendations for cancer prevention, including limiting sugary beverages, red meat and salt/sodium.

Here are key take-aways from the new heart health guidelines: Continue reading