Study: Following AICR Recommendations Cuts Breast Cancer Risk

Post-menopausal women who follow at least five of AICR’s recommendations for cancer prevention may cut their risk of developing breast cancer in half compared to those who meet none, suggests a new study that adds to previoiStock_000016308603_ExtraSmallus research showing how each recommendation met decreases a women’s risk.

The three recommendations that most helped women reduce their risk of breast cancer in this study related to eating plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains; being a healthy weight; and drinking one or fewer glasses of wine a day.

The study was published early in the online edition of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. It was funded by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.

For the study, researchers pulled data from approximately 31,000 participants of the VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) study. The women were ages 50 to 76 at the start and had no history of breast cancer. When the study began, the women filled out questionnaires on their eating habits, weight, activity, medicines they take and other factors that may play a role in breast cancer risk. Continue reading


New Guidelines Echo AICR’s Dietary Approach

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans were released this morning and here at AICR, we’re excited about their emphasis on preventing obesity and eating more plant foods.

The new guidelines say that America’s overweight and obesity epidemic played a major role in developing the recommendations. The obesity epidemic carries a steep cost, the guidelines point out,  increasing the risk of many chronic diseases, such as heart disease and cancer. Most are preventable. (For cancer, AICR estimates that over 1/3 of the most common cancers could be prevented if Americans ate healthy, exercised more, and stayed lean.)

A few of the guidelines’ take-home messages include:
• Enjoy your food, but eat less.
• Avoid oversized portions.
• Make half your plate fruits and vegetables.
• Switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk.

Overall, the guidelines support AICR’s recommendations for cancer prevention, which also emphasize the importance of staying a healthy weight and eating more plant foods.

So take a look at your plate. If you want to get started putting the guidelines into action tonight, try using AICR’s New American Plate approach.

There’s a lot in the guidelines; you can read all of it here. Stay tuned for more and let us know what you think about them.