Study: AICR Recommendations Lower Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

Man eating watermelonA new study appearing in the journal Nutrition and Cancer found that following at least four AICR/WCRF recommendations for cancer prevention reduced men’s risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer tumors by 38%.

The study, which came out of UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, looked at adherence to seven of AICR’s ten recommendations in over two-thousand African-American and Caucasian men aged 40-70 recently diagnosed with prostate cancer. The risk of aggressive tumor development was found to be lower in those men who followed four or more recommendations regardless of race.

Why should I pay attention?  I thought only old guys in their eighties got prostate cancer.  After skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men. One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer sometime during his life.  In 2013, almost 239,000 men in the U.S. will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and nearly 30,000 will die from the disease.  Being overweight, smoking, and a lack of vegetables in the diet are linked to a higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer (as opposed to the slower-growing form of prostate cancer). Aggressive cancers mean lower survival rates, making these findings on preventing aggressive forms even more relevant. Continue reading


Study: Men with Prostate Cancer May Survive Longer with Vegetable Fats

canstockphoto13663884For the approximately 2.5 million men living with prostate cancer, a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that eating nuts and other foods high in vegetable oils may play a role in lengthening their lives.

Compared to men with prostate cancer who ate the least amount of vegetable fats, the men who ate the most had a lower risk of dying during the study from cancer or any other cause. Study analysis also concluded that men with the disease may lower their risk of dying by replacing calories from carbohydrates and animal fats with vegetable fats.

The study included 4,577 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 1986 and 2010. Every four years the men reported their typical diet during the previous year, answering questions on fried food consumption and what type of fat they used to cook. The study focused on mortality related to consumption of different types of fats: saturated, polyunsaturated, trans, animal, and vegetable fats.

After a median of almost 8 and a half years, 1,064 of the men had died. Most of the men – almost a third –died from heart disease. Another 21 percent died from prostate cancer specifically and another 20 percent from other cancers. Continue reading


Lab Study: Soy Plus Tomato May Help Prevent Prostate Cancer

Adding plump red tomatoes to your salad is a great way to add some cancer-fighting food into your diet because tomatoes are loaded with lycopene, along with other phytochemicals. AICR’s expert report and its updates found that canstockphoto13200480tomatoes and other food containing lycopene lower the risk of prostate cancer, specifically. Now, a new lab study suggests that eating tomatoes with soy foods may be even more protective against prostate cancer than each food consumed separately.

They study was published online in Cancer Prevention Research.

For the study, researchers wanted to look at the effects of tomato and soy — separately and in combination — on prostate cancer development. Along with tomato and its phytochemicals, lab studies have suggested that soy and its compounds also reduce prostate cancer risk.

The study used a type of mice genetically engineered to develop an aggressive form of prostate cancer. Researchers placed the mice into four diet groups: 1) whole tomato powder; 2) soy germ; 3) tomato powder and soy germ; and 4) control group that did not eat soy or tomato. Soy germ, just like wheat germ, is the reproductive part of the soy that germinates to grow into a plant. Continue reading