New Study: More Healthy Habits to Prevent Colorectal Cancer

canstockphoto2174868Following at least two healthy behaviors that are key AICR Recommendations, such as eating a healthy diet and being active, lowers the risk of colorectal cancer to some degree, with the more you follow the lower the risk, suggests a new study that highlights the importance of practicing multiple healthy behaviors.

Published in BMC Medicine, the study joins a growing body of independent research that investigates how AICR Recommendations for Cancer Prevention link to reduced risk of specific cancers, survivors, and mortality. Here are some of those other studies.

This latest study was conducted among 350,000 Europeans ages 25 to 70. They are part of the large European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), which spans 10 countries. When people joined EPIC they gave information about their diet, smoking, activity and other lifestyle habits. Continue reading


Treat Dad to Brazilian Chicken

brazilian-chicken cropped2Even the pickiest Dad will enjoy the unique combination of cancer-preventive ingredients in our Health-e-Recipe for Brazilian Chicken with Black Beans. It’s a hearty alternative to red or processed meat on Father’s Day.

Red or processed meat can increase risk of colorectal cancer, according to AICR’s Continuous Update Report findings. So combining chicken with delicious black beans in this recipe yields 32 grams of protein, balanced with five different vegetables. The Brazilian flavor comes from nutmeg, fresh orange, parsley and cayenne pepper.

Serve it up with brown rice or another whole grain, plus a salad of dark leafy greens, tomatoes and carrots, dressed with olive oil-balsamic vinaigrette and topped with some chopped avocado to continue the South American theme.

Find more excellent cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Is My Christmas Ham a Processed Meat?

Simply put? Yep.

“Processed meat” is any meat that’s preserved by salting, smoking or curing, or by adding chemical preservatives. That means sausage, bacon, cold cuts like pastrami and salami, hot dogs and, yes, ham.bigstock-Dinner-Festive-4350476

Why does it matter whether or not ham counts as processed meat? Because the evidence on processed meat is different than the evidence on red meat, so our recommendations are different, too.

AICR’s expert report and its updates have consistently and convincingly shown that diets high in red meat are a cause of colorectal cancer. This is why we recommend moderating red meat intake to keep it below 18 ounces (cooked) per week. In studies, consumption at or below this threshold is not associated with increased risk.

When it comes to processed meat, the evidence is just as consistent and convincing — but a good deal more stark. That’s because the evidence on processed meat suggests that no “safe threshold” exists. A modest increase in risk for colorectal cancer is seen with even occasional consumption of processed meat, and continues to rise as consumption increases. Continue reading