Playing the Odds: What We Mean by “Prevention”

Cancer prevention: It’s what AICR is all about. We fund research, analyze data and produce recommendations, all with the same goal in mind — saving lives.

We want to reduce the burden tbigstock-Magnifying-Glass-Person-Search-5197835hat cancer places on the population, both in lives lost, as well as in the billions of dollars now spent on cancer care. We want to make cancer much, much more rare.

When researchers and policy makers talk about “cancer prevention,” that’s what they mean. They’re looking at the issue from the population level, with the goal of reducing the number of cases of cancer that occur within a given group.

When we at AICR talk to the research community or policy makers, “prevention” is the word we use, as its nuanced technical meaning is generally understood.

But when we talk to individuals – when we translate the science into practical, easy-to-understand information that people can use in their daily lives, we have to be careful. Continue reading


Pair Chicken with Pears

chicken-and-pear-saladChopped fruit makes a salad tastier and higher in cancer-fighting phytochemicals. Our Health-e-Recipe for Chicken and Pear Salad is a great example.

Pears are one of the most delicious autumn fruits. Their juicy texture and sweet taste are a natural complement for chicken. A few kinds of pears include: Anjou, with a yellow-green skin and slightly bitter edge; Asian, which looks and tastes like an apple; Bartlett, round, bumpy and quick to ripen; and Bosc, red and slim with a firmer texture.

Spicy red onion and cool cucumber provide a crunchy contrast in this salad. Toss these healthy ingredients together with a honey-lemon dressing that has a hint of mint and cinnamon.

For more delicious cancer-preventing recipes, visit the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.

 


Breastfeeding Grades Improving: Helping Health and Cancer Risk

bigstock-Mother-breastfeeding-the-littl-18348869More than three out of four babies born in the U.S. in 2010 breastfed for any length of time, according to the 2013 Breastfeeding Report Card released yesterday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC says America’s breastfeeding grades are improving with the highest rates since they began measuring in 2001.

And that’s good news because breastfeeding offers many health benefits for babies and moms, including decreased risk for moms for both pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer, and lower risk for obesity for baby. One of AICR’s recommendations for cancer prevention is that mothers breastfeed exclusively for up to 6 months.

From my work in breastfeeding education and promotion even just 15 years ago, I know the struggles breastfeeding advocates face in encouraging moms and dads to try breastfeeding and in making hospitals and other institutions supportive of breastfeeding. So I am pleased to see more families choose to try for at least some length of time. Continue reading