Gaps in Breast Cancer Research: Getting You to Eat Well and Exercise

You may know that being a healthy weight and exercising can cut your risk of breast cancer, but understanding how to translate these recommendations into action is one of the “critical gaps” in research that can save lives, finds a new study published in Breast Cancer Research.Unveiling #1 - Covered & Confident

The study, which comes at the start of Breast Cancer Awareness month, identifies ten critical gaps in breast cancer research. The authors include more than 100 experts.

Developing interventions and support to improve breast cancer survivors’ health and well-being is another gap in the research. Other critical areas where more research is needed include genetics, molecular markers, treatment and tailored screening and survivorship materials. Convincing clinicians to shift their practice into prevention is another area that needs work, according to the study.

You can read all ten gaps the authors identify in the paper.

As the study points out, when it comes to lifestyle change for breast cancer prevention, there remain many unknowns. We don’t know the relative affect of lifestyle changes on lowering the risk of different types of breast cancers, such as ER negative or ER positive. Does the effect of eating habits depend upon whether you are 15 years old or 50? And how many years do these lifestyle interventions offer protection? Continue reading


Progress in Prevention: The Affordable Care Act

Leave the politics aside, if you can. All of us who work to fight cancer and other chronic diseases can agree on one thing: We need to do more than treat the problem. We need an increased national focus on preventiohttp://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-nutritionist-holding-green-apple-weight-scale-image28463742n.

The Affordable Care Act that goes into action tomorrow, October 1, marks significant progress on that score. Its increased focus on obesity is an acknowledgement that obesity causes major health issues. AICR research shows that obesity increases the risk for seven different cancers.

For the first time, you can receive obesity screening and counseling at no charge. This handy USA Today article reviews some of the ways that different plans will address obesity counseling and related efforts. Continue reading


Playing the Odds: What We Mean by “Prevention”

Cancer prevention: It’s what AICR is all about. We fund research, analyze data and produce recommendations, all with the same goal in mind — saving lives.

We want to reduce the burden tbigstock-Magnifying-Glass-Person-Search-5197835hat cancer places on the population, both in lives lost, as well as in the billions of dollars now spent on cancer care. We want to make cancer much, much more rare.

When researchers and policy makers talk about “cancer prevention,” that’s what they mean. They’re looking at the issue from the population level, with the goal of reducing the number of cases of cancer that occur within a given group.

When we at AICR talk to the research community or policy makers, “prevention” is the word we use, as its nuanced technical meaning is generally understood.

But when we talk to individuals – when we translate the science into practical, easy-to-understand information that people can use in their daily lives, we have to be careful. Continue reading