AICR Opposes Proposed Cuts to Science, Cancer Prevention Research

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Health and science research face massive cuts in last week’s proposed White House budget that — if enacted — would set back research on cancer prevention and ultimately cost lives, says the American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR).

The proposed budget for fiscal year 2018 slashes the National Institutes of Health funding by 5.8 billion dollars, approximately 19 percent. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the National Institutes of Health.

While the proposed budget does not give details on what will be eliminated, AICR stands against any cuts that will slow and possibly irrevocably setback the progress in improving cancer prevention and survivorship.

In 2017, there will be an estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases. Over 600,920 people living in the United States will die from this disease. Research over the past few decades has led to a greater understanding of what drives cancer development and what protects us. Only through analyzing the global research has AICR’s network found many ways in which diet, weight management and physical activity lowers people’s cancer risk.

Research now shows that hundreds of thousands of US cancer cases can be prevented every year. At a time when the field has come so far, there is an urgent need to continue this research. Only through more study can individuals – and the country – prevent much of the cost, loss and suffering that cancer brings.

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    Now, on World Cancer Day, We Already Have the Knowledge, Tools to Prevent So Many Cancers

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    In his State of the Union address, President Obama announced a “moonshot” program to fight cancer. In charge of that program, Vice President Biden has met with oncologists, scientists, and other leaders in the cancer field, and stated that, “We’re trying to get to a quantum leap on the path to a cure”

    Anne McTiernan MD, PhD.
    Anne McTiernan MD, PhD.

    Much of the focus has been on Big Data, and on sharing science across institutions, in the effort to quickly move results from the lab to the public. In a nation where approximately four in ten people can expect to be diagnosed with invasive cancer in their lifetimes, we need big efforts to fight this disease.

    Today, World Cancer Day, is a time to raise awareness of prevention: Cancer prevention needs to be a part of the renewed push against cancer.

    Focusing only on the cure is like trying to douse a forest fire on one front while someone is lighting matches on another. The good news is that we already have the knowledge and tools here on earth to prevent a large proportion of cancers from developing, without reaching for the moon.

    WCD adAvoidance of known carcinogens (including tobacco, excess radiation, sun and tanning), and use of vaccines for human papilloma and hepatitis B viruses, can prevent a wide range of cancers such as lung, skin, liver, cervix, mouth and throat. Screening and removal of premalignant lesions can prevent several cancers including those of the skin, colon, and cervix. Medications have been shown in clinical trials to prevent breast or prostate cancers in persons at high risk for those cancers. Read more… “Now, on World Cancer Day, We Already Have the Knowledge, Tools to Prevent So Many Cancers”

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      New Dietary Guidelines: Helping You With Plant Foods, Added Sugar; Misses Mark on Meat

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      The new Dietary Guidelines for Americans are out and they take a step in the right direction to help you make choices to lower your risk for cancer. Two key pieces of advice–eat a healthy diet that includes plenty of plant foods and keep sugary foods and drinks to a minimum. And that could mean fewer cases of cancer associated with poor diet and obesity.2015 Dietary Guidelines_Draft 2[1]

      You can put these into practice with our New American Plate model – filling at least 2/3 of your plate with vegetables, legumes, whole grains and fruit, and 1/3 or less with fish, poultry, meat and dairy.

      The guidelines also recommend keeping your added sugar to 10 percent or less of your total calories. As we wrote earlier about the nutrition label and sugar, if you follow a 2000 calorie diet, you could have about one cup of fruit yogurt and one small dark chocolate bar. That’s because foods with high amounts of added sugar contribute to overweight and obesity, a cause of 10 cancers, including colorectal, postmenopausal breast and kidney.

      Unfortunately, the Dietary Guidelines does not reflect the evidence-based recommendation from the independent expert committee to advise Americans to limit red and processed meat. It is disappointing that industry lobbying efforts succeeded in preventing the clear and simple message that these increase risk for colorectal cancer. AICR research has shown that red and processed meats are convincingly linked to colorectal cancer, and the World Health Organization has also recently established that link. Here’s our recommendation:Red Processed Meat Rec

      Read more… “New Dietary Guidelines: Helping You With Plant Foods, Added Sugar; Misses Mark on Meat”

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