From the Poster Session: Meet the AICR Grantees

By Posted on

Several AICR-funded researchers came to our conference last week to present their latest findings in the poster session:

Dr. Emmanuel T. Akporiaye of the Robert W. Franz Cancer Research Center in Portland, Oregon, updated us on the progress of his grant examining the effect of a derivative of vitamin E on breast cancer tumors. (Earlier this year, we profiled Dr. A in AICR’s biweekly e-newsletter Cancer Research Update.  A longer version of that interview appeared in this Summer’s AICR ScienceNow newsletter.)

AICR Grantee Emmanuel Akporiaye Dr. Nameer B. Kirma of the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio presented data from his work with soy components and breast cancer.
AICR Grantee Nameer Kirma

Dr. Meghan M. Mensack is using an AICR grant at the Colorado State University to study the anti-cancer potential of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L)

AICR Grantee Meghan Mensack

Lots more AICR-funded scientists, after the jump.

Read more… “From the Poster Session: Meet the AICR Grantees”

SHARE:

    The Powerful Potential…of Pineapple

    By Posted on
    YouTube Preview Image

    At last night’s poster session, we caught up with Dr. Laura P. Hale of Duke University Medical Center.  Dr. Hale’s using an AICR grant to study bromelain, a combination of enzymes found in the stems of pineapples.  Specifically, she’s adding fresh pineapple juice to mouse diets to test its effect on the kind of inflammation that has been linked to colon cancer. 

    As you’ll see, she’s getting some very promising results.

    SHARE:

      Phytochemicals: The Big Picture

      By Posted on Leave a comment on Phytochemicals: The Big Picture

      It’s the end of the afternoon session and Dr. Young-Joon Surh from South Korea is giving an overview of the health benefits of phytochemicals when it comes to cancer prevention. He talks about the work they have done on the health benefits of resveratrol, which has shown anti-cancer properties. Name a fruit or vegetable (or spice) and it likely contains a phytochemical studied for cancer prevention – or other health benefits. 36_Pike_Place_Market_very_long_display_of_fruits_and_vegetables

      There’s many, many studies revealing how these phytochemicals act in the body: A lot of it seems to relate to reducing chronic inflammation. Hopefully soon, says Dr. Surh, we will know enough to identify what foods will help different groups of people at high-risk for cancer.

      SHARE: