A Fresh Topping for Pasta

rigatoni-and-red-peppers cropped copyWho knew that a delicious pasta dish could fit into a cancer-preventive diet? Our Health-e-Recipe for Rigatoni with Red Peppers fortifies with phytochemical-rich vegetables and fiber, which reduces risk of colorectal cancer.

Whole-wheat pasta has fiber plus protective compounds inherent in whole grains. If you can’t find whole-wheat rigatoni for this dish, try a similar type of bite-size whole-grain pasta, such as penne, rotini or macaroni.

Lightly sautéed red onion, red bell pepper, cherry tomatoes and spinach to toss with the pasta. You’ll be getting powerful onion phytochemicals, vitamin C in the peppers and tomatoes and lutein from the spinach, all reinforcing each other with health-protection benefits. They’re a fresh change from bottled pasta sauce. Topped with fresh basil and Parmesan, this dish is a tasty and low-calorie way to welcome the spring.

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Valentine’s Day Starter: Blackberry Salad

greens-with-blackberry-dressing croppedIf you’re looking for a way to make your meal elegant and still cancer-preventive, blackberries are an ideal choice. Our recipe for Baby Greens with Blackberry Vinaigrette is a perfect starter for a romantic Valentine’s Day dinner.
All berries contain cancer-preventing polyphenol phytochemicals. In this recipe, blackberries’ sweet-tart taste blends well with contrasting shallots and Dijon mustard in the dressing. Our recipe also puts some whole berries into the salad for an attractive combination with the salad’s greens, goat cheese and walnuts.
Blackberries may seem expensive, but if you compare them with a bag of far less nutritious chips, you get more health benefits from berries for the same cost. They have few calories and provide fiber, vitamins and phytochemicals.
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Liven Up Lentil Soup

asian-lentil-soupIf you ever wished for a more interesting lentil soup, our Health-e-Recipe for Asian Lentil Soup helps you create new depths of flavor in cancer-preventive lentils.

First you sautee fresh carrots, celery, red bell pepper, onion and Chinese cabbage (bok choy) in aromatic sesame oil. These veggies are high in cancer-preventing compounds. After mixing with the lentils and vegetable broth, you add the pungent flavors of garlic, ginger, soy sauce, hoisin sauce and red pepper flakes.

Hoisin sauce is made of soybean paste, chilies and salt and tastes sweet, salty, spicy and tangy all at the same time. It’s thick and concentrated, so you only need a little bit for a lot of flavor.

For each serving of this excellent soup, you get 10 grams of protein and plenty of fiber. Try adding about half a cup of cubed firm tofu to get 8 more grams of protein (and 80 calories) while keeping this delicious dish healthy and cancer-preventive.

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