Bright Berry Pudding

berry-pudding croppedOur Health-e-Recipe for Red Berry Pudding with Cream gets high marks for being a healthy, low-calorie and beautiful holiday dessert.

Using unsweetened frozen raspberries and strawberries keeps this dessert low in calories. That way, you can control the sweetness by adding only the small amount the recipe calls for. Ditto for the light cream.

Berries are powerhouses of cancer-preventive phytochemicals. AICR grantees and other researchers are continuing to find polyphenols and other health-boosting compounds in all kinds of berries. This holiday season, fill your plate with a variety of berries and other plant foods — vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts and seasonings — to get the most cancer protection and keep calories low.

Find more delicious cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Roasted Veggie Salad: Sweet!

root-veggie-salad croppedRoasting root vegetables brings out their sweetness without adding sugar. Our Health-e-Recipe for Roasted Root Vegetable Salad is an attractive holiday side dish that’s filling, low-calorie and cancer-fighting, too.

This easy recipe requires nothing more than cutting and peeling a few colorful root vegetables: sweet and white potato, carrot, onion, celery and beet. Their protective phytochemicals reinforce each other to protect you from cancer while adding beautiful hues to your plate.

While they roast, mix up our delicious Mediterranean dressing. Healthy mustard, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, mustard, parsley, cilantro and walnuts are whisked into extra virgin olive oil. A crumble of feta cheese on top of this salad provides a delicious contrasting taste.

Serve at room temperature or chilled. You can even put it on a bed of mixed leafy greens to get more fiber and phytochemicals. Add a whole grain and some lean protein for a complete meal. Find more delicious, cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.

 

 

 

 

 


A Lighter Apple Pie

square-apple-pie coppedIf you and your family love apple pie on Thanksgiving, try a healthy new spin on this holiday favorite with our Health-e-Recipe for Square Apple Pie.

The pieces may be square, but we’ve cut corners on calories by using less high-fat pastry and sugar. Instead, our recipe is a lighter treat that’s perfect for following a heavy meal and it’s loaded with fresh apples.

All apples provide cancer-preventive flavonoid phytochemicals and fiber, especially when you leave the peel on. They also contain the antioxidant vitamin C and pectin, a substance that may help lower cholesterol. The best apples for baking are tarts ones like green Granny Smith, Fuji, Cortland, Northern Spy or Winesap.

If you’re inclined to add whipped or ice cream to your pie, why not serve a sugarless, fat-free version or a dollop of low-fat vanilla yogurt, frozen or not.

Find more delicious, nutritious recipes for cancer prevention at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our Health-e-Recipes.