Study: Obesity Increases Risk of Pancreatic Cancer Death Among African Americans

obesity-and-cancer

Click on image for full infographic.

Among the population as a whole, research shows a strong link between being obese and increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Now a large new analysis suggests that obesity increases the risk of African Americans dying from pancreatic cancer, a cancer that affects African Americans more than any other racial group.

The study was published in Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention.

African Americans are diagnosed with and die from pancreatic cancer more than any other racial group, according to the National Cancer Institute. Previous research focusing on obesity, African Americans and pancreatic cancer included only a few study that gave conflicting findings.

For this analysis researchers pooled data from seven studies, including almost 240,000 African Americans. The studies all had used self-reported information to calculate BMI, a standard measure of body fat.

Continue reading


The Science of Common Sense: More Evidence that AICR Recommendations Save Lives

Last week, yet another independent scientific study added to the robust evidence that following AICR’s 10 Recommendations for Cancer Prevention is powerfully protective against a great many diseases and conditions, not simply cancer alone.

This latest study found that childhood cancer survivors who follow more of our Recommendations are less likely to develop metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that raises the risk for heart disease and other health problems. We wrote about this new study in this week’s Cancer Research Update, our biweekly email newsletter on breaking cancer news.

Screen Shot 2014-08-07 at 11.38.01 AMPrevious independent studies have shown that our Recommendations protect against breast cancer and prostate cancer, reduce risk for cancer death, help people live longer, and improve cancer survivors’ physical and mental health. This latest study is a welcome addition to the ever-growing evidence that our advice maximizes your chances for leading a long and healthy life.

But in a way, it just makes sense. Continue reading


Sodas Top Desserts for Added Sugars; Last Day for Label Comment

If you want to know how much sugar food manufacturers are adding to your foods, today’s your last day to tell the FDA. That could make a difference to how much added sugars people consume, suggests a recent study, which found that Americans are getting far more of our added sugars from sugary beverages than desserts or candy combined. And,canstockphoto10102403 for the most part, we are purchasing those sugary products from stores.

The study, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, also found that almost 15 percent of Americans’ daily calories comes from sugars added to our foods or drinks.

For cancer prevention, cutting down on sugary beverages is one of AICR’s 10 recommendations. Sugary sodas and other beverages link to weight gain, and being overweight links to increased risk of eight cancers.

In an average American’s day, sodas and energy sports drinks was the largest source of added sugars, making up 34 percent. Grain desserts, such as cookies and other baked goods, was the next largest category coming in at 13 percent; fruit drinks, candy and dairy desserts followed, at 8, 7 and 6 percent, respectively.

Continue reading