6 Habits for Restaurant Dining and Lower Cancer Risk

In the U.S. we eat about one-third of our food away from home – including both fast food and full service restaurants. A study published this week in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that you may be getting almost an entire day’s worth of calories in one sit-down restaurant meal.bigstock-Eat-healthy-with-this-menu-of--35851439

The researchers looked at the nutritional value of meals at 21 full-service restaurant chains and found that, on average, a single meal (entrée, side and one-half appetizer) contains almost 1500 calories, 28 grams saturated fat and 3300 milligrams sodium. Add a shared dessert and a beverage and the calories jump to over 2000.

Eating this way regularly can lead to overweight and obesity – and increased risk for several cancers, including colorectal, post-menopausal breast and pancreatic cancer. Continue reading


Holiday Hang-Ups: Staying Healthy in the Workplace

You sit all day. The vending machine’s full of sugary soda. Sandy from Accounting keeps a heaping bowl of fun-size candy at her desk, which you walk past on your way to and from the copier.

bigstock-an-apple-is-on-a-computer-keyb-44723527The workplace is where you spend most of your waking time, a closed environment filled with constant inducements to move less and eat more. At holiday time, those inducements multiply. Today, more and more Human Resources professionals are taking steps to create healthier workplaces, because they know that healthier employees are happier — and, yes, more productive.

Here at AICR, we’ve taken a series of steps to ensure we’re practicing what we preach. Here’s just a few of the ideas we’ve instituted:

  • The AICR Walking Club meets three times a week at lunchtime for a brisk walk around the neighborhood. The group activity helps members motivate one another to get and stay active. We’re looking into a running group for those employees who want to kick up their activity even more. Continue reading


Analysis: Can You Be Obese and (Metabolically) Healthy? Probably Not

Can you be obese and healthy — at least metabolically healthy? Probably not, suggests the latest review of the research, which finds even people who are metabolically healthy and obese are at increased risk for an earlier death and risk for cardiovascular disease.bigstock-Fat-man-Isolated-on-white-He-41560129

The study — published in the Annals of Internal Medicine — did not look at cancer specifically, but metabolic health is a big topic in cancer risk these days.

Many signs of poor metabolic health are factors for increased cancer risk, as well as type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

If you read this blog you probably know that the heavier you are, the more your risk increases for many cancers, including postmenopausal breast, colorectal, and pancreatic. And obesity brings metabolic issues. Continue reading