Final menu labeling rules released, how they can help cancer prevention

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A year from now when you dine out, you’ll be seeing just how many calories you’re ordering up with that muffin, salad or drink, thanks to the just released final FDA guidance for menu labeling. If you live in places like New York, Philadelphia, Seattle and California, you already see this information, but these new rules – part of the Affordable Health Care Act – are the first national standards for menu labeling.

bigstock-Eat-healthy-with-this-menu-of--35851439The requirements mean that any restaurant, concession stand, bakery or other eating venue with 20 or more locations will need to post calorie counts on their menu. Other nutrient information, such as saturated fat, carbohydrates, fiber and protein, will need to be available upon request.

Some national restaurants have already started to do this. Enforcement for everyone begins in May 2016.

This is an important tool for cancer prevention because Americans eat at least one-third of their meals away from home – usually with more calories than meals at home. With eleven cancers now linked to obesity, this information can help Americans choose healthy, moderate calorie meals more often and help prevent over 130,000 cases of cancer every year in the US. Read more… “Final menu labeling rules released, how they can help cancer prevention”

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    Behind The Headlines: Questions about AICR’s Stomach Cancer Report

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    We’ve just released our latest systematic review of the global literature linking diet, weight and physical activity to an individual cancer; this time, it’s stomach cancer in the spotlight, and there’s some striking news.

    The report’s three major findings – that alcohol, processed meat and obesity increase the risk for stomach cancers – are entirely new. Much of the research makes important distinctions that previous research didn’t, and there’s more to know about stomach cancer risk than easily fits into a headline. Here, we answer questions about some of the nuances that have emerged.

    Two of these three new risk factors apply to distinct types of stomach cancer, cardia and non-cardia. What’s the difference? Read more… “Behind The Headlines: Questions about AICR’s Stomach Cancer Report”

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      Obesity rates continue to climb, and that’s not good for cancer prevention

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      Both here in the US and around the world, obesity rates continue to climb. Today, for the first time, more people are classified as obese than underweight, finds a major new study published in The Lancet.

      The findings have severe implications for cancer rates. Aside from not smoking, staying a healthy weight is the single largest risk factor related to cancer risk. AICR research links excess body fat to ten cancers, including colorectal, postmenopausal breast and esophageal.

      Here in the US, if everyone were a healthy weight, AICR estimates that approximately 128,000 cases of cancer could be prevented each year.

      obesity-and-cancer-1 Read more… “Obesity rates continue to climb, and that’s not good for cancer prevention”

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