New Dietary Guidelines: Helping You With Plant Foods, Added Sugar; Misses Mark on Meat

The new Dietary Guidelines for Americans are out and they take a step in the right direction to help you make choices to lower your risk for cancer. Two key pieces of advice–eat a healthy diet that includes plenty of plant foods and keep sugary foods and drinks to a minimum. And that could mean fewer cases of cancer associated with poor diet and obesity.2015 Dietary Guidelines_Draft 2[1]

You can put these into practice with our New American Plate model – filling at least 2/3 of your plate with vegetables, legumes, whole grains and fruit, and 1/3 or less with fish, poultry, meat and dairy.

The guidelines also recommend keeping your added sugar to 10 percent or less of your total calories. As we wrote earlier about the nutrition label and sugar, if you follow a 2000 calorie diet, you could have about one cup of fruit yogurt and one small dark chocolate bar. That’s because foods with high amounts of added sugar contribute to overweight and obesity, a cause of 10 cancers, including colorectal, postmenopausal breast and kidney.

Unfortunately, the Dietary Guidelines does not reflect the evidence-based recommendation from the independent expert committee to advise Americans to limit red and processed meat. It is disappointing that industry lobbying efforts succeeded in preventing the clear and simple message that these increase risk for colorectal cancer. AICR research has shown that red and processed meats are convincingly linked to colorectal cancer, and the World Health Organization has also recently established that link. Here’s our recommendation:Red Processed Meat Rec

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Sugar and Breast Cancer, An Intriguing But Early Animal Study

One of the most common questions we get here at AICR is about sugar. And it can be confusing. The overall body of evidence suggests that sugar’s link to cancer risk is an indirect one: diets high in sugar can lead to obesity, and excess body fat is a cause of ten different cancers.

But now comes a study performed in mice that is getting a lot of media attention. It suggests a more direct link between sugar consumption and breast cancer development. Published in Cancer Research, the study is interesting, says AICR Vice President of Research Susan Higginbotham, PhD, RD, “but it’s important to recognize, that this is a single study and it is testing diets in mice, not in people.”

Our reports, which have reviewed thousands of studies on diet and cancer, have found no evidence that sugar or added sugar directly causes cancer in humans. We recommend limiting energy-dense foods and avoiding sugary drinks, but current evidence suggests it is not necessary to avoid sugar altogether.”

AICR Sugar Rec

The animal study
In this animal study, researchers fed groups of mice diets with increasing amounts of the sugar sucrose – your basic white table sugar – and compared them to mice fed a sugar-free starch-based diet. These mice all were carrying breast cancer cells. Continue reading

6 Healthy gift ideas for kids

Last week we highlighted 10 Unique Gifts for Good Health to help your loved ones find creative ways to move more and eat smart — which will help them lower their risk for cancer. Most ideas were for adults, but the holidays are a lot about kids. And developing healthy habits during childhood can help kids stay lean as adults, which will reduce their risk of adult cancers.

Here, we asked the experts and health enthusiasts for gift ideas that will have kids excited, engaged, AND help their health:

illustration of music background in doodle style

  1. The Gift of Music. Dancing is a great way to be physically active for cancer prevention. Artists like the Singing Lizard are making tunes that both kids and adults can enjoy. So, get the music going, put on your dancing shoes and get the party started.

 

 

2. Garden Kits. Encourage healthy eating habits pizza garden by having kids grow their own vegetables and fruits. Growums garden kits are specially designed for kids with easy to follow instructions and a website full of interactive games. With kits like “Stir-Fry Garden” and “Pizza Garden” kids are sure to dig these gifts.

 

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