Reducing your breast cancer risk – top three takeaways from new report

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We just released our Breast Cancer Report, updating the research and findings from 2010. The new 120-page report packs a lot of research, statistics and discussion of lifestyle factors relating to breast cancer risk.

What do all the stats and research mean for you? Here are three of the most important take-aways, the major findings and how you can put them into action.

Physical Activity –

The finding: Moderate and vigorous physical activity lowers risk for postmenopausal breast cancer. Vigorous physical activity lowers risk for pre-menopausal breast cancer Read more… “Reducing your breast cancer risk – top three takeaways from new report”

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    A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth

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    A hormone produced by the liver called fibroblast growth factor 21, or FGF21, might play a role in curbing your sweet cravings, suggests a recent study published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

    The brain and gut (which includes the liver) work together in what’s called the central reward system to control what we like and choose to eat – including sweets. Differences in that system can promote unhealthy eating habits, which can lead to obesity, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. Read more… “A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth”

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      New study – higher weight links to earlier death

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      There’s been some controversy about whether being overweight, but not obese, might actually link to a longer life. A few years ago a major study suggested that paradox. We wrote about it here.

      For lower cancer risk, healthy weight is key. AICR’s reports find that overweight and obesity increase risk for 11 cancers, including colorectal and postmenopausal breast.

      In this new analysis on weight and mortality, researchers used a person’s highest weight during the study and found that those who were overweight or obese had increased risk for early death. The data comes from 225,000 participants in the Nurses Health Studies (NHS I and II) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS). It was published last week in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

      Read more… “New study – higher weight links to earlier death”

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