Reducing your breast cancer risk – top three takeaways from new report

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We just released our Breast Cancer Report, updating the research and findings from 2010. The new 120-page report packs a lot of research, statistics and discussion of lifestyle factors relating to breast cancer risk.

What do all the stats and research mean for you? Here are three of the most important take-aways, the major findings and how you can put them into action.

Physical Activity –

The finding: Moderate and vigorous physical activity lowers risk for postmenopausal breast cancer. Vigorous physical activity lowers risk for pre-menopausal breast cancer Read more… “Reducing your breast cancer risk – top three takeaways from new report”

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    For World Cancer Day, how physical activity can lower your cancer risk

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    Globally, cancer is a leading cause of death and the statistics are sobering.  Worldwide cases of cancer are predicted to reach 21.7 million by 2030.

    Today on World Cancer Day – and throughout Cancer Prevention Month – one big theme is about getting individuals to play a more active role in reducing their cancer risk. Being active is an important way to do that, and that’s the theme for World Cancer Day.

    You surely know that exercise is good for you, but what most Americans don’t know is that being active actually decreases your cancer risk.

    Our 8th Cancer Awareness Survey, released this week, showed that only 39 percent of Americans know that inactivity relates to cancer risk. And it does.

    Read more… “For World Cancer Day, how physical activity can lower your cancer risk”

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      For diet and cancer prevention, do we really know enough to act?

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      We do know enough now to make eating choices that lower our risk of cancer. In fact, we know that for people with typical American diets, waiting for more information before making any changes is increasing their risk of cancer.

      It’s true that research on diet to lower cancer risk is a hot area with many questions still to be answered. That’s why it’s important when making changes to make your decisions on guidelines based on the overall body of research. Trying to act on each new study that makes headlines can make you feel like you’ve got whiplash… not a wise approach.

      This year’s AICR Research Conference featured the renowned Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard University presenting his view of what we know and don’t know on diet and cancer. Here’s my take, based on Dr. Willett’s presentation and others at the conference. Read more… “For diet and cancer prevention, do we really know enough to act?”

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