Study: Lowfat Diet, Weight Loss, and Survival For Women with Specific Breast Cancers

A new long-term study that adds to the research on diet and breast cancer survival finds that women with certain types of breast tumors who reduced their dietary fat for years after diagnosis — and also lost weight — had lower death rates over the next 15 years than survivors on a standard diet. canstockphoto16568943

The study was presented today at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium and is not yet published in a journal.

It was funded in part by AICR and joins a growing body of research investigating how diet affects women diagnosed with breast cancer. In October, an AICR report on breast cancer survivorship in partnership with WCRF found some indication that fat may play a role in survival. The Continuous Update Project report found there was limited but consistent research suggesting that eating lower amounts of total fat and in particular, saturated fat, before a diagnosis of breast cancer linked to improved survival.

Weight loss may also play a role, as the low-fat group lost a a modest but significant amount of weight in this study. The CUP report found indications that being a healthy weight may lengthen survival for women diagnosed with breast cancer. But the report’s findings were not strong enough to make a specific recommendation.

Observational evidence relating to low-fat diets and breast cancer survival is mixed and previous research from another major randomized dietary study among breast cancer survivors – the WHEL study – found a lowfat diet did not affect mortality or recurrence.

The study presented today included approximately 2,400 women who were part of Women’s Intervention Nutrition Study (WINS), a study that first launched in 1987. All the women were diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and they joined the study within six months of diagnosis. Continue reading


New Analysis: High-fat to Low Helps with Weight Loss

Whether the amount of fat we eat affects our weight has been a hot topic of debate for years. Now, an analysis of the research finds that fat matters, and just switching higher-fat foods for their lower-fat counterparts – without any other dietary change – can help dieters lose a modest but significant amount of weight.

The study was published online in BMJ.

For the analysis, researchers looked at the 43 studies that compared a group of people who ate a low-fat diet to those eating the usual amount of fat. Thirty-three of those studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), lasting from six months over eight years and including almost 75,000 people.

RCTs are considered one of the strongest types of studies, randomly giving one group the dietary intervention and then tracking all involved. Continue reading