Fun Cancer-Prevention Living Tips for Parents, Families

­Overweight and obesity are responsible for about 120,000 cases of cancer in the United States each year. Nearly 1 in 2 Americans develops cancer at some point in their lives. http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photo-happy-boy-eating-salad-broccoli-inside-home-image30044420

Although cancer touches many of us, many parents and health educators are unaware that prevention starts early – in childhood, or even in utero! Diet can affect not only your health, but that of generations to come. Last month, I spoke about healthy eating strategies for parents and educators in a webinar, working with AICR.

Here are some highlighted tips for cancer prevention:

  • Eat more beans. They’re packed with phytochemicals and fiber –both, which can play a role in disease prevention. To cut back on sodium in canned beans, rinse them first. It decreases the sodium content by as much as 40%.
  • Find creative ways to move more! Have a “dark party” with your kids and their friends. Buy a pack of Glow-sticks and give each child a couple, crank up the volume on their favorite dance tunes and turn off the lights!

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Report: Teens Getting too Much Screen Time

About three of every four adolescents are in front of the TV and the computer beyond what is recommended, with youths who are overweight in front of screens more than their healthy weight peers, according to a new government report.

The National Center for Health Statistics report focused on how much screen time 12 to 15 year olds were getting outside of school, citing high screen times’ link with high blood pressure, cholesterol, and being overweight.

For cancer prevention, AICR recommends limiting sedentary activities. Long amounts of time sitting – such as watching TV – links to overweight and obesity, a cause of eight types of cancers. We wrote about the latest research linking inactivity and cancer risk last month.

ScreenTime

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Making it Easier for Kids to Eat Whole Grains

Research shows many reasons why it’s important for kids to eat a diet rich in whole grains. Whole grains can help your kids – and you – maintain a healthy weight. And as your kids become older, whole grains can help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart diseases, and diet-related cancers.Wheat ears in the child hands

Recent research that I have collaborated on through the CHANGE Study suggests that children who ate more than 1.5 servings of whole grains every day had a 40 percent less risk of being obese than children who did not consume whole grains.

Yet only about 5 percent of American adults and children eat the recommended servings of whole grains every day and not all whole-grain products are good or excellent sources of dietary fiber. There are a lot of positive developments in what food companies and others to help kids get more whole grains. But there is still more progress that we can make in three main settings.

Marketplace: Changes made by food companies that have reformulated ready-to-eat breakfast cereal products, combined with new school nutrition policies and healthier meals served at home, will collectively make it easier for children to consume the recommended three servings of whole grains every day. Continue reading