So You’re Thinking of a Standing Desk? Learn From Us.

varidesk image

A few AICR staff enjoying standing while working!

There’s been a buzz around the AICR office lately. Not only because we kicked off our CanPrevent campaign, but a new wave of staff has opted to install standing desks! It’s wonderful to walk past offices and see some of my colleagues standing tall and typing away or reading.

Our organization offered them to us because studies have suggested that sitting or lying down for long periods of time may play a role in increased cancer risk. Standing doesn’t replace being active, but it is one way to put AICR Recommendations into action.

Standing desks were new to everyone here, so I went around asking my coworkers about their experiences and challenges. Here’s the overview.

The biggest challenges
Two challenges people faced were getting sore feet and going back and forth between documents on their desk and computer when they were standing. Comfy shoes and adapting your desk space could help – see tips below. Continue reading

Study: Less TV, More Walking May Help Colorectal Cancer Survivors Live Longer

There’s strong research now showing that being active can reduce your risk of colorectal cancer, but how physical activity affects survivors of this cancer is not as clear. Now comes a study suggesting that being active — both before and after diagnosis —can lengthen survival for colorectal cancer survivors.dreamstime_17313188

Not watching a lot of television — a common measure for sedentary living — was also found to improve survival. Survivors who were watching fewer than two hours a day of TV before diagnosis had a reduced risk of mortality compared to those watching five or more hours of TV a day.

The study was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology last week.

For pre-diagnosis, study authors used data from approximately 3,800 survivors who were part of the large NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study study. In the mid 1990s, the participants were 50 to 71 years old. They answered questionnaires about how much TV they watched, their activity and other lifestyle habits. Those who had developed colorectal cancer were identified in 2006. Continue reading

Inactivity Links to One in Ten Cancers Worldwide

Worldwide, one in ten cases of both breast cancers and colon cancers is due to a lack of physical activity, with inactivity as much to blame for the major chronic diseases as smoking or obesity, finds a major new report published today in The Lancet.

The study’s cancer preventability figures expand the estimates released at last year’s AICR Research Conference, which linked inactivity in the United States to three of every ten colon cancers and two of every ten breast cancer cases.

In this study, researchers quantified for the first time the global impact of physical inactivity, suggesting that inactivity is responsible for almost 9 percent of all deaths worldwide.

The findings are one in a series of six (free) papers published today in The Lancet.

Continue reading