Health-e-Recipe Champion: Brussels Sprouts Beat Brownies

We all know Brussels sprouts are healthy. They’re an excellent source of vitamin A, C, K, fiber and folate. As a cruciferous vegetable, they’re rich in carotenoids and glucosinolates, phytochemicals that both show an ability to reduce inflammation, neutralize carcinogens and control abnormal cell growth in lab studies.

Brussles and Brownies

Brussels sprouts are always humble champions.

But no one ever said they were better than brownies…until now. After 4 weeks, 16 recipes and over 1300 votes, the most controversial vegetable has been declared the winner of AICR’s Recipe Contest. Competing against colorful salads, spicy soups, classic comfort foods and even our famous brownies, it definitely earned its spot as our 500th Health-e-Recipe.

So take the challenge, and try out the winning recipe for yourself. Head over to our Facebook page to tell us what you think and you could win a New American Plate cookbook, filled with tasty, healthy recipes to try. Continue reading


The Beauty of Beets…Countdown to Vote

beet-salad croppedOnce you’ve tasted fresh beets, you’ll be enchanted by their sweet taste and beautiful color. Our Health-e-Recipe for Beet, Carrot and Apple Salad shreds them with tart Granny Smith apples, carrots and chopped walnuts into a cancer-preventive salad.

Beets contain potassium, vitamin C, folate and fiber. Their phytochemicals include betalains, a class of health-protecting compounds that may be best absorbed when uncooked. Beet greens – which can be eaten lightly steamed – provide lutein, a phytochemical that protects eyesight and is also found in spinach (a botanical relative of beets).

In the U.S., fresh beets are often roasted. Eating them raw is more unusual, yet once you have, you may prefer them to the pickled versions that are high in sodium and may be packaged with added sugar. (Our recipe also tells you how to peel them without coloring your hands red.)

This week’s recipe marks our #499th issue. You can help us pick our milestone 500th Health-e-Recipe by voting in our Championship Round. It’s Lasagna versus Brussels sprouts: Vote in Recipe 500.


March Madness Beginnings; Talking with Our Recipe Developer

It’s down to the Championship round in our Recipe March Madness, which means your votes will pick next week’s 500th Health-e-Recipe. To make it as one of our cancer-protective recipes, we go through a rigorous process that involves a lot of experts, including recipe developers. I chatted with cookbook author and one of our developers, Dana Jacobi, to discuss hoDana Jacobi head miniw she became interested in healthy eating and why new cooks may want to grab a chicken breast.

Dana, a self-taught cook with French culinary training, developed a passion for cooking at a young age. After a 20-year career in marketing, she took a leap of faith to pursue her passion for food.

Q: How did you start cooking?
A: I grew up in New York City and always loved food. My family and I were adventurous and open to trying new and unfamiliar food and cuisines. When I was in high school I started to cook for fun and my mother encouraged me to make dinner anytime I wanted.

Q: How do you generally go about developing recipes?
A: One of the most important things for me is seasonality. Working with fresh, beautiful ingredients that are in season make for good building blocks. Sometimes my creativity is sparked by a specific ingredient or by a meal as a whole. I also like to keep tabs on current trends and I keep a list of things that I see in food magazines, blogs and websites. Continue reading