A Fresh Topping for Pasta

rigatoni-and-red-peppers cropped copyWho knew that a delicious pasta dish could fit into a cancer-preventive diet? Our Health-e-Recipe for Rigatoni with Red Peppers fortifies with phytochemical-rich vegetables and fiber, which reduces risk of colorectal cancer.

Whole-wheat pasta has fiber plus protective compounds inherent in whole grains. If you can’t find whole-wheat rigatoni for this dish, try a similar type of bite-size whole-grain pasta, such as penne, rotini or macaroni.

Lightly sautéed red onion, red bell pepper, cherry tomatoes and spinach to toss with the pasta. You’ll be getting powerful onion phytochemicals, vitamin C in the peppers and tomatoes and lutein from the spinach, all reinforcing each other with health-protection benefits. They’re a fresh change from bottled pasta sauce. Topped with fresh basil and Parmesan, this dish is a tasty and low-calorie way to welcome the spring.

Find more cancer-fighting recipes and information about National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


A Long Winter; A Hearty Winter Salad

winter-bread-salad croppedOur Health-e-Recipe for Winter Bread Salad gives you a heartier kind of salad that’s appealing in cold weather.

Instead of buying croutons, which are usually high in calories and salt, toast some whole-wheat bread cubes. High in cancer-preventive fiber, these homemade croutons will be moistened by the vinaigrette dressing for this salad while keeping their crunch. They also contrast well with the salad’s sweet onion, garlic, tomatoes, celery and romaine lettuce.

Mixing bread chunks into salad is a tradition in Italy, where this dish is called “Panzanella.” Serve it with our Tuscan Chickpea Soup or Chicken Cacciatora from the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Pleasing Pea Soup

super-split-pea-soup croppedHot, filling and healthy, our Health-e-Recipe for Super Split Pea Soup is a great dish to ward off wintry chills.

Peas are a legume, like dry beans and lentils. Legumes have plenty of cancer-fighting fiber (a robust 17 grams per serving in this recipe).

All legumes contain protein without fat, so they are a great way to cut back on meat while still getting good nutrition. You get 21 grams of protein per serving of this soup’s combination of peas and chicken broth.

Herbs and vegetables, including onion, carrots and potatoes, round out Super Split Pea Soup with protective phytochemicals. Serve it up with a hunk of crusty whole-grain bread and freeze the leftovers to enjoy on other chilly winter days.

Find more delicious cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.