Making Your Lentils Savory in Indian Dal

indian-dalLentils and dry beans are rich in fiber that helps to prevent colorectal cancer. Our Health-e-Recipe for Indian Dal with Yogurt and Cucumbers makes lentils into a savory treat.

Onions, ginger, garlic, cumin and Indian spice mix (“masala”) give these lentils more of the protective phytochemicals found in al plant foods, plus a spicy fragrance that stimulates the appetite. Lentils also contain protein, and dal is a dish eaten daily in India.

Although red lentils are called for in this recipe, you can opt for green lentils instead. Lentils don’t need soaking and can be cooked either to a liquid consistency of soup or simmered longer until they become thick enough to eat as a dip with whole-wheat pita bread. Creamy, cool yogurt and chopped cucumber balance the spices in the lentils. It only takes 30 minutes to prepare this tasty, nutritious dish.

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Packing Whole Grains for Lunch, Recipe

If you’re trying to eat healthier at work — after all, its National Employee Wellness Month —  packing a lunch that’s high in fiber can give you lasting energy for the workday while helping you prevent cancer. Take our Health-e-Recipe for Lemon Brown Rice Pilaf.canstockphoto8528856

Toss this rice with a little tuna or salmon (buy it canned in water, then drained) plus some leafy greens and salad veggies for a complete meal. You can make a batch for a weekend meal then divide the leftovers into single portions and refrigerate or freeze them for lunches throughout the workweek.

Roasting lemon slices make brown rice tangy, and it’s an easy step that only takes a little time. When coated with olive oil and roasted, lemons’ natural sugar caramelizes into a rich dark brown that coats the rind. Continue reading


Recipe: Layers of Cancer Protection

Roasted Veg Lasagna copyOur Health-e-Recipe for Roasted Vegetable Lasagna is meatless and full of hearty, delicious cancer-fighting ingredients. It’s also runner-up to our March Madness winner, Brussels Sprout Slaw.

To prepare the eggplant and zucchini slices for roasting, you can either use canola oil cooking spray or brush them lightly with some olive oil, if you prefer. Then roast them for 20 minutes on each side. Roasting veggies makes them sweet and tender.

Then layer them onto the low-fat cheese mixture and top with tomato sauce. All processed tomato products (think juice, paste, sauce) contain plenty of lycopene. This compound is a carotenoid that may help guard against prostate and other cancers, according to research studies.

Because of their higher fiber content, whole-wheat pastas and other whole grains take longer to digest than refined grains. That’s one reason why eating them can help keep your blood sugar levels healthy.

Together with the vegetables in this dish, the higher fiber in the noodles provides a substantial 11 grams of fiber per serving. That’s almost one-third of the amount recommended daily by health experts. Eating plenty of high-fiber foods like vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans while keeping meat consumption low can help prevent colorectal cancer.

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