A Cookie with a History (and Whole Grains)

anzac-cookies croppedApril is the month when soldiers in the Australia and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) fought the famous World War I battle at Gallipoli. Their bravery has been commemorated in part with a treat featured in our Health-e-Recipe for ANZAC Cookies.

Whole-wheat pastry flour plus oats and unsweetened shredded coconut help to make this cookie unique. Both contain dietary fiber that prevents colorectal cancer and possibly other types of cancer. These cookies are as nutritious today as when they were developed back then and sent to the troops in care packages from home.

You can make your own ANZAC Cookies to fortify yourself during a busy day. Enjoy them as a snack, a filling dessert or even a breakfast treat completed with some protein like low-fat yogurt and fruit.

This cookie makes us two shy of our 500th Health-e-Recipe. Vote for your pick of our milestone recipe on our Recipe March Madness, where you can also subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Cancer-Fighting Whole Grains: Are They Trending on Your Plate?

Today is Whole Grains Sampling Day – a great time to try one (or more) of these delicious cancer-fighting foods.Cereals - maize ,wheat, barley, millet, rye, rice and oats

Whole grain foods are fiber-rich and they promote health in many other ways. But most Americans fall short of the US Dietary Guidelines’ recommendation to make at least half of their grain choices whole grains.

You an explore new choices, one step at a time. Here are some tips I’ve shared with patients and ways that I swap out refined grains for delicious whole grain foods:

If your day typically starts with coffee and a donut or even a white flour bagel:

  • At Home: Try a whole wheat tortilla – Spread on some peanut or other nut butter, add banana or apple slices, roll it up and eat it at home or on your way to work or school.
  • On Your Way: Choose the oatmeal to go at the coffee shop or fast food drive through. Ask for the nuts, fruit and sugar on the side to keep the calories right for you.

For lunch – whether you bring your own frozen meal or grab a sandwich at the local deli:

  • Frozen entrée – take a close look when you’re shopping in the freezer aisle and choose one that includes brown rice.
  • Deli sandwich –ask for whole wheat bread or roll; or look for soup that includes barley or wild rice.

Dinner  - this can be a great time to gradually add more whole grains for you and your family:

  • Spaghetti dinner – cook half whole-wheat thin spaghetti and half white flour spaghetti and top with your favorite sauce.
  • Try whole grain muffin or cornbread mixes for a great accompaniment to your stew, soup or salad meal.

Check out our latest Foods that Fight Cancer- Whole Grains, for ways to start replacing your refined grains with whole grains along with recipes and tips for buying and storing them.

What are ways you put whole grains on your plate?


Making it Easier for Kids to Eat Whole Grains

Research shows many reasons why it’s important for kids to eat a diet rich in whole grains. Whole grains can help your kids – and you – maintain a healthy weight. And as your kids become older, whole grains can help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart diseases, and diet-related cancers.Wheat ears in the child hands

Recent research that I have collaborated on through the CHANGE Study suggests that children who ate more than 1.5 servings of whole grains every day had a 40 percent less risk of being obese than children who did not consume whole grains.

Yet only about 5 percent of American adults and children eat the recommended servings of whole grains every day and not all whole-grain products are good or excellent sources of dietary fiber. There are a lot of positive developments in what food companies and others to help kids get more whole grains. But there is still more progress that we can make in three main settings.

Marketplace: Changes made by food companies that have reformulated ready-to-eat breakfast cereal products, combined with new school nutrition policies and healthier meals served at home, will collectively make it easier for children to consume the recommended three servings of whole grains every day. Continue reading