2014 Trends for Cancer Prevention You Can Do Today

Last week, Colby wrote about trends in cancer research. Here, I’d like to weigh in on trends to lower cancer risk – not predictions, but habits I’d like to see everyone do and therefore become a top trend.bigstock-Bitten-Apple-And-Pedometer-41281678

1. Track your health-related habits.

Tracking helps you be aware of what, how much and when you are eating or exercising. You can then identify what changes you want to make and what would be realistic.

Use whatever method works best for you. Try paper and pencil – get a small notebook that fits in your briefcase, purse or pocket. After each meal or snack, write down everything you eat and, depending on your goal, how much you ate. There are also many phone apps or online programs that calculate calories, nutrients or other analyses. Continue reading


Study: Yearning for Watery Fruits and Veggies after Workout

If you were to go running there’s a good chance you’ll be yearning for an apple instead of a doughnut afterwards, suggests a recent brain imaging study, and that may be because your brain is pushing you towards water.bigstock-Silhouette-Of-Head-With-Fruits-47793388

Physical activity is one factor that can influence our appetite, possibly by its role in altering our brain signals related to hunger and pleasure. This study focused on bouts of a high-intensity activity: running.

The study was small — 15 lean men — but it may help explain how exercise relates to hunger and overall health. It was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

In the study, the men first ran for an hour and then at a later day, they rested for an hour. For each trial, the men had easy access to water.

Ten minutes after they ran or rested, researchers scanned specific areas of the men’s brain as they looked at two dozen food images. In random order, they saw images of high-calorie foods — such as brownies, ice cream, pizza and fried chicken — and low calorie foods, including grapes, apples, lettuce, and carrots. (They also saw two dozen images of non-food items.) Continue reading


How Researchers and Dietitians Get Those 30 Minutes

Of AICR’s ten recommendations for cancer prevention, being active for at least 30 minutes a day can be one of the more challenging ones. But it’s important. Research shows regular exercise reduces risk of several cancers directly. It also helps with weight control, and being at a healthy weight means reduced risk of seven cancers.

Research also suggests a host of perks we get from being active, from mental well being to heart health. And it can be fun.

So how do scientists and dietitians get their 30 minutes? At our research conference in November, we found out: