Fireworks and Pasta Salad

Penne Pasta with VegetablesBefore the fireworks light up the sky, chill out with our easy Health-e-Recipe for Pasta Salad with Tomatoes for your 4th of July celebration – or anytime.

Tomatoes, green pepper and basil are tossed with whole-wheat bowties, penne, spirals or any other favorite small-sized pasta. Along with the garlic, these plant foods contain compounds that may be cancer protective. They also provide fiber, as does the whole-wheat pasta. Fiber has been associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer by strong evidence in AICR’s CUP report. It also is digested more slowly than white pasta, which keeps blood sugar levels in a healthy range.

The dressing for this salad is a vinaigrette made with olive oil and sweet-tart balsamic vinegar, both healthier than the mayonnaise-based dressings many pasta salads use.

Find more delicious healthy recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our Health-e-Recipes.


New Analysis: Eat Slower, Eat Less

How long did it take you to eat breakfast? What about dinner? If you want to cut calories without being hungry, a new review of the research suggests that eating that meal a little slower may help you do just that. Clock Made Of Spoon And Fork

Dietitians, and mothers everywhere, have long suggested that people should eat slower. A few observational studies have also noted that heavier people eat more quickly than those who are leaner.

But this analysis focused only on experimental studies. It adds to the evidence that eating slower may help  people get to a healthy weight, without being hungry. And being at a healthy weight is one of the most important ways to reduce cancer risk, given that overweight and obesity link to increased risk of eight cancers.

For this analysis, researchers found 22 studies that each manipulated how fast people ate, then measured how much they ate. Most of the studies randomly assigned people to an eating-rate group. Continue reading


“Eat Butter”? The Skinny On Saturated Fat

The cover story on this week’s issue of TIME Magazine is making waves – and driving sales at the nation’s checkout counters. The article traces the recent history of nutrition science, specifically the 20th-century vogue for health messages about cutting consumption of saturated fat. It does a nice job laying out how those messages were seized upon by food marketers to create today’s grocery aisles thronged with “fat-free” and “low-fat” processed foods.Tasty butter on wooden cutting board isolated on white

But ironically, in its effort to rehabilitate the reputation of saturated fat by showing how that food component has been isolated and demonized, the article effectively demonizes carbohydrates, blaming them for the same health conditions once widely linked with saturated fat.

It’s only the latest article in the popular press to do this. But while it makes a compelling read, singling out any one food or food component for blame oversimplifies a field of study marked by complexity and nuance.

As a cancer research and education organization, we should note that AICR’s expert reports and their updates have found no strong links between dietary fat itself –whether saturated or unsaturated – and cancer risk. Instead, it’s the fat we carry on our bodies that is strongly linked to increased risk for eight different cancers. Continue reading