A Tempting Cauliflower Treat

cauliflower-x2172 cropped2Crunchy, cool and cancer-preventive, our Health-e-Recipe for Cool Cauliflower Salad is low in calories and abundant with flavor.

Just because cauliflower is white and not green, like its cruciferous relative broccoli, doesn’t mean it’s lacking in powerful phytochemicals that may help ward off cancer. Along with cauliflower and broccoli, cruciferous vegetables include cabbage, Brussels sprouts, turnips, kale, collard greens, radishes, parsley and watercress.

At 50 calories a serving, this tasty salad can also be a heartily portioned snack. Vegetables are naturally low in calorie density and high in fiber and water. That means they fill you up for not too many calories, compared to equal amounts of high calorie-dense foods that have lots of fat and sugar. That’s why eating a mostly plant-based diet of minimally processed foods can help keep off extra pounds while giving you protection from plenty of cancer-fighting phytochemicals.

Find more delicious cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Resistant Starch May Reduce Red-Meat Colorectal Cancer Risk

Eating high amounts of red meat increase risk of colorectal cancer while fiber-filled food reduces the risk, AICR research shows. Now comes a study that offers one possible explanation for both links, finding that diets high in red meat and a type of non-digestable fiber have opposite effects on a group of genetic molecules.Chuckwagon Chili Con Carne

The study was published in Cancer Prevention Research.

Study researchers focused on a type of fiber called resistant starch. Our bodies don’t digest resistant starch in the small intestine. Then in the gut, bacteria convert resistant starch into the compound butyrate. In lab studies, this compound protects against colon cancer.

For the study, 23 participants, ages 50 to 75, switched between two types of diets. In one diet each person was given 300 grams — about 10 ounces — of raw lean red meat a day. That’s about the equivalent of a cooked 8 ounce burger. The other diet had the same red-meat content plus a butyrate resistant starch formulation. Each person was on one diet for four weeks then after a four-week washout period, switched to the second diet for four weeks. Continue reading


A Fresh Veggie Quinoa

quinoa-and-broccoli croppedFirm, tender cauliflower and broccoli florets pair beautifully with quinoa in our Health-e-Recipe for Quinoa with Cauliflower and Broccoli.

Both of these cruciferous family vegetables are well known for their cancer-fighting compounds, especially isothiocyanates and indoles. And broccoli and cauliflower are even more protective in this dish, which also uses bell peppers, onion, garlic and oregano. That’s because each ingredient offers its own set of cancer-preventive phytochemicals, which reinforce the others. Eating a wide variety of vegetables improves the odds of reaping their health benefits.

Quinoa is a whole grain that may rank highest in protein content, providing 8 grams per cup. Along with the vegetables, it also contains cancer-fighting fiber. To add protein but keep it light, serve this dish with some diced chicken breast or baked fish.

Find more delicious cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.