It’s What You Eat – Not Just Where You Eat

Last Friday, a new study prompted headlines proclaiming that eating away from home and eating fast food may not link to obesity. Today, we’re hearing about a study from a scientific meeting showing that eating more homemade meals links to lower risk for type 2 diabetes.

Both obesity and type 2 diabetes link to many common cancers, including colorectal, liver and postmenopausal breast. But with seemingly contradictory take-aways, you may be left wondering – does it really matter where and what I eat?

Yes, it does!

Here’s what the researchers agree on: Continue reading


Bacon, Hot Dogs and Lunch Meat – Is it Processed Meat?

Today, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) named processed meat as a carcinogen. AICR has included avoiding processed meat as one of our recommendations for cancer prevention since 2007. Processed meat (and high amounts of red meat) increase risk for colorectal cancer.

Here’s our statement on the WHO report.

Both organizations found that for processed meat, even small amounts eaten daily – 50 grams or 1 small hot dog – increases risk for colorectal cancer by 18% compared to eating none.Red Processed Meat Rec

So what exactly is “processed meat”?

AICR defines processed meat as:

“meat preserved by smoking, curing or salting, or addition of chemical preservatives.” Ham, bacon, pastrami, sausages, hot dogs and cold cuts are all considered processed meat. Continue reading


Study: Vegetarian Meatloaf Just as Satisfying- and a Bonus for Cancer Prevention

Vegetarian Lentil LoafA fiber-rich bean-based meal can be just as satisfying as a protein-rich beef-based meal, according to a recent short-term study, published in the Journal of Food Science. The findings are good news if you want to cut back on red meat and up your fiber intake – both recommendations for cancer prevention.

This early study included 28 healthy adults (50% women) who consumed 2 “meatloaf” test meals on separate visits matched for portion size, calorie, and total fat content.

  • Meal one was a high protein beef meatloaf, about one-half the daily value of protein (26 grams), and one-eighth the daily value fiber (3 grams).
  • Meal two was a high fiber, moderate protein bean-based “meatloaf” – about one-third the daily value protein (17grams ), and half the daily value fiber (12 grams).

Researchers compared the effect of both meals on reported hunger, satiety, and fullness, as well as calorie intake at later meals.

Source: Bonnema, A, et al., The Effects of a Beef-Based Meal Compared to a Calorie Matched Bean-Based Meal on Appetite and Food Intake. Journal of Food Science, 2015

Source: Bonnema, A, et al., The Effects of a Beef-Based Meal Compared to a Calorie Matched Bean-Based Meal on Appetite and Food Intake. Journal of Food Science, 2015

Continue reading