5 Favorite Recipes, Cancer-Fighting Foods for Your Thanksgiving Table

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Your Thanksgiving table is full of traditional foods that promote good health and reduce the risk of cancer. We’ve picked our 5 favorite recipes with cancer-fighting foods that the whole family will love. How many of these can you fit in your spread this year?

1. Cranberries: These bright red gems contain vitamin C, dietary fiber and anthocyanins, compounds well-studied for their cancer-fighting properties. Read more… “5 Favorite Recipes, Cancer-Fighting Foods for Your Thanksgiving Table”

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    Anti-inflammatory diet may lower risk of mortality from heart disease among breast cancer survivors

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    There’s been a lot of research on anti-inflammatory diets over the years, much of it related to cancer and other chronic diseases. That’s because chronic inflammation is strongly associated with the development of many cancers, such as colorectal.

    Those links led to University of South Carolina researchers developing a dietary inflammatory index — a measure of how much foods and its components may increase or decrease inflammation. Here’s some of foods. Read more… “Anti-inflammatory diet may lower risk of mortality from heart disease among breast cancer survivors”

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      Study: Now is the Lowest Weight You’ll Be All Year

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      As we head toward the holidays, you’ll be hearing advice on how to avoid packing on the pounds – and then how to lose it. And it’s a good idea to pay attention, because a new study highlights that Americans really do gain weight over the holidays.

      That’s not good for cancer risk, because too much body fat links to increased risk for 11 cancers, including colorectal and postmenopausal breast.

      The recent study, published in a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine, also sheds light on just how long losing the weight gain may take.

      Using data from almost 1,800 adults weighing themselves on electronic wireless scales over a year’s time, researchers found that Americans begin gaining weight in early November and continue until early January. It takes until mid-October to get back to their lowest weight. Not unique to the US, people in Germany and Japan experience similar trends during their popular holidays.

      In the US, the Christmas holiday period led to the most significant chunk of weight gain by far and then Thanksgiving. Read more… “Study: Now is the Lowest Weight You’ll Be All Year”

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